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  1. C.A.F.

    R.I.P. Gav240Z

    ...well not quite. But he may as well be, as his life is now over more-or-less. Yesterday, around midday, Gavin and Maria welcomed Achilles Van Doolan into the world weighting in at 3.73kg / 8.22lbs and 50cm long (Nort Bhad. Good Size). I'm sure you will all join me in congratulating Gav and Maria, and hopefully we'll see him again in around 16-18 years...
    14 points
  2. Update 17.10.20 - TOUCHDOWN! So my daughter is 1 month old today! What a blur and whirlwind the last month has been. Firstly, I won a pair of long champs off yahoo auctions Japan to go on the rear end, and had them air freighted over. They were at my door in 3 days. They had tyres on them, but shipping would have doubled to send them with rubber, they were new tyres and a good brand, but they were only a 185 wide tyre stretched over a 7.5 inch rim. i would have needed to buy new proper fitting tyres anyway, so i opted to have the tyres stripped off in japan and just have the rims sent. This left me with a dilemma of needing rubber for the back, oh, and the front, because the tyres on the front rims were 20 years old and dry rotted. So i went on book face and found someone selling 4 good year 215/60/15 tyres. I managed to get all 4 for only $80! Good size for the front, "ok" for the back, i will buy 225/60/15's for the back to make it abit more chunky, but wanted to see how this 215's fit first, and see how much clearance i have. No point spending $300 on 2 tyres to find out they rub and hit the shock and coil. So It dam near took me 1 month, but i was able to get the rear drum brakes assembled and back together, and got her back on all 4 wheels for the first time in over 5 years! . She is sitting HEAPS high at the back, which is strange, as i put in the 240z strut top mounts at the back, so it should be sitting about a inch or 2 lower. Is it because its still a empty shell, and when i put some weight in her, the rear will come down? I'm not convinced, because really, what is there to go back in? a fuel tank? some glass? The rear shocks were blown out when i removed them, so maybe that made it sit lower before, and now because i have fitted new KYB Excel G shocks, maybe that is contributing to it sitting higher? I have the standard rear springs in it still, I didn't fit the lowering springs at the back, maybe i should..... Anyway..... When Alexis was 2 weeks old my wife organised a professional baby photoshoot, My care factor about it was minimal, but when she came, i directed her into the garage for some snaps! here are a few of my favourites: . And i really like this one, might get it blown up and framed to put somewhere, maybe in my gaming room: New video will be done and edited.... lol.... whenever i get some free time! which is not often! HA! Rudolf
    11 points
  3. C.A.F.

    Project: Factory Fresh

    Happy New Year Everyone
    10 points
  4. CBR Jeff

    Jeff's 240z build

    Hope everyone has had a great Christmas and are heading to a happy new year. Our son and his partner gave me a great Christmas present. Max arranged a local artist to draw the Z including an ode to my old mate Rocky (RIP). I will admit to having a tear in my eye. I also made a short video of the build from start to finish (6 years). Been out and about driving as much as I can and thoroughly enjoying the experience of driving the car and the reactions I get from people. Jeff
    10 points
  5. 10 points
  6. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    LH inner and outer sill assembly is now done. I can't do anything about the doglegs (rockers) until I receive quarters... The bottom of the LH A-post was gone, so I made a new section and welded it into place. And I remade the lower section of the LH rear door jamb area as that was badly repaired previously. Liberal application of KBS Rust seal: Outer sill screwed into position and the door fitted to check the gaps: Onto the RH side next...
    9 points
  7. C.A.F.

    Project: Factory Fresh

    Lighting in the workshop wasn't great and doesn't do them justice, but they are just too pretty not to share...
    9 points
  8. Just an FYI, everyone has messaged me about this. Both are spammers from Russia, accounts deleted and all messages with it. RaskM and Orange15. I will run some software updates soon(new release within the last week) to see if that will help keep them out for next time.
    8 points
  9. "The Z looks great!" Evan said. "Would you be interested in restoring the body for me and painting it?" "Sure" I said. "But the mechanicals will also need re..." "I can take care of all that Locky - I used to be a mechanic in a previous life, and I'd like to at least do something on the 260Z. And I'd like to strip the parts off it myself, if that's OK with you? But with the current pandemic restrictions I'm not sure when I could make it down. I also have some family matters to attend to." "No worries Evan. We can store it until you can come down" I said. This conversation was in November 2020... In February 2021 I contact Evan to see how he was going, and he replies that he's not going to be able to come down in the foreseeable due to family issues. "Can you strip it for me?" Evan asked. "Sure" I said. "But it wont be for a few months are we are pretty busy at the moment. Mid year would be the earliest we could start". So in the second week of June we start stripping it down; cataloging everything, bagging and tagging, taking notes and packing everything away for safe-keeping. Up onto the rotisserie it went once it was a bare shell and we started looking at the rust issue - it didn't appear to be too bad. Rust holes in the floors, doglegs have been poorly repaired along with the slam panel. So the usual. Now to get it media blasted... And this is where we are currently up to - so more photo's to come...
    8 points
  10. Hi folks, Someone contacted me recently to notify me that new members had contacted them to say they had parts they were searching for, but after sending payment via PayPal never heard back. They luckily got a refund from PayPal. However when I looked up these members they had strange login locations like Lagos, Pheonix and Pennsylvania etc.. Not to say we don't have legit members in those locations but generally speaking our members tend to be in Oz. I do my best to keep spam off the forum, I manually review every new members first posts before approving them. But it seems some members are sending PMs before making any posts and may slip under the radar. I would highly recommend only trading with well known established members with an established community reputation. Report any PMs from members that have not yet posted if you suspect they may be non legitimate. I leave the forum open to make it accessible to the community, but with that comes dealing with the lowest of the low scum from third world sh1t holes also sadly. So if we all stay vigilant we can help keep them out of the community.
    8 points
  11. Hey good people. I am a long time (i.e. old fart) Z fan from way back when the 240z first came out. I currently own a Forester S edition which is super handy and a bit of a sports machine in its own right but prior to that owned a 2013 Magma Red 370z which was a beautiful car but sold it because I was doing a ton of driving between the Illawarra and Goulburn and the highway driving was killing the duco with stone chips thrown up by trucks etc, and couldn't bear to see stone chips on immaculate paint. So, stupidly, I sold it and bought the Foz which I still have today. A wonderful wagon and very versatile, but I am basically a sport's car fan at heart and am still considering going back to a 370z now that I work in the Illawarra. Prior to owning the Magma Z, I was very fortunate in buying a 2002 RX7 FD very cheaply. I'd owned a gorgeous red one previously about 15 years before and turned it into a rocket ship before some young guy made me an offer on it I couldn't refuse and sadly, ran it into a tree 12 months later, writing it off. I'll always have a soft spot for the old rotary, and I would have kept it except there are no decent mechanics locally worth a pinch who know anything about them. When I owned the red one, I had to take it into Sydney to have work done on it. However, most stuff on the engine I ended up doing myself. My introduction to the 240z happened around 1980 when I was still a teenager. I lived up in Moss Vale back then and there was a car dealership there called Giddings Datsun. Well, I remember one day driving past in my (not very fast but nice looking) electric blue with yellow side striped 1971, single webbered Ford Capri 1600, when I spotted a red with black bonnet 240z. I had to check it out, of course. I asked the salesman how much and he said probably three grand. He said it had just come in. I asked if I could take it for a test drive and he handed me the keys and said "don't flog it because we don't know anything about it". Well, I remember giving it a spirited drive around town for about ten minutes. I drove it home to my mothers and asked if I should buy it. She said if I can get a loan then why not. However, my brother, who was living a couple of houses up from me at the time checked it out and said not to buy it because it didn't have an original motor in it. It was a 280c engine with twin webbers (it may have had triples- can't remember) and holy shee-yit did it fly! Honest to god I have never forgotten how much fun I had in that ten minutes it that car. I have never been in a car that went that fast before. Even my mildly worked RX7 twin turbo beast didn't have that kind of neck snapping power. (At least that is how I remember it now. But back then, even my sisters Gemini auto was probably quicker than the Capri I was driving around in. I think the only car I can compare its speed to was when a guy took me for a drive in his worked XU-1. The Z was nearly as quick as that. So, why the hell didn't I buy it? Friends, that is the question I have been asking myself ever since. Maybe it was because my brother didn't think it was worth it (if only we had a crystal ball and if only I'd known at the time that a 2.8 litre engine swap was a desirable thing to do back in the day) , and maybe I wasn't working that much, and 3 grand in 1980 was still a lot of money then. But I have never forgotten that little drive I took in that gorgeous z car. I guess that brings me to the next stage of this rather long- winded story. I've been so fortunate to have owned a number of desirable cars that are now big dollar items but were relatively cheap back then. (I won't bore you with the luckiest find I ever had, picking up a beautiful black xc coupe 351 for $3000 in 1998 that was sitting on the side of the road in Corrimal. Sold it a year later, like a dope.) And I have imported a few cars from the USA over the years, starting with a beautiful 1955 Buick Century coupe that still ran its original 322 nailhead. Yep, sold it. If you look closely, to the right, you can just make out my beautiful red RX7 FD. Sadly, I lost virtually all of the pictures of it due to a hard drive failure. Are you getting the picture here? Anyone have a shotgun they can shove down my throat? My greatest achievement was taking a 54 F100 custom pickup truck from a non starting roller with a dead 327 Chevy and swapping it to a right hand drive with an xj6 jag front end, full disk brakes, power steering and added air conditioning and t350 auto, new dash, new wiring, gauges, the works and got it fully road registered when nobody in the family believed I could do it. Mind you, it took four years. And then sold it.... Sheesh. I am so pathetic! So now I am on the wrong side of mid fifty and thinking about reviving that old feeling from the 80's., and the only thing that can scratch that itch is another 240z. To be honest, I haven't even bothered looking locally. The prices being asked for a 240z just make my nose bleed, and I am not that scared of converting something to right hand drive. I am within a whisker of picking up a neat 1972 240z from the USA. It's gonna take a while to hit town, but I hope to document as best I can the story as to how it all pans out. Thanks for welcoming me on board. I have been here for many years, usually under a different username or whatever and mostly as a quiet observer and admirer, but I have really never left the forum. Bye for now. Wish me luck on the pending purchase, guys! Peter
    8 points
  12. C.A.F.

    Project: Factory Fresh

    We have it painted! It was a late night for my painter, but we have the whole car in colour now. It looks amazing and we can't wait to get stuck into reassembling it!!!
    8 points
  13. Thanks for sharing Alan, very interesting. I was lucky enough for visit Zama a couple of years back, the guides were super helpful, gave a parting gift on the way out and you could buy GTR water from the vending machine which I lugged around in my backpack for the following three weeks The journey there was a great memory also, for no particular reason, just stuck with me. Maybe it was the gardens, I've worked in the fresh food industry for many years!
    8 points
  14. Got some more photos from Locky of CAF. Check out these beautifully gapped panels! Bodywork is almost drawing to a close. Some beautiful work done to this shell thus far. looking on track, and in to paint when our guy is next available.
    8 points
  15. C.A.F.

    Project: Factory Fresh

    Finally... Into the paint shop! The body was rubbed back and was given a coat of Epoxy, then Primer. And then the colour went on in the engine bay, door jambs and the underbody was blown in, in 901 Silver: Then the scuttle gray and radiator black was applied:
    8 points
  16. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    After a bit of farnarkling and swearing, the RH Funky Green floorpan is in. LH Side is next...
    7 points
  17. Mike_F

    Fire Rescue 240Z

    It's about time I documented my 240Z restoration project. People have been hassling me to do youtube videos, but since I hate the sound of my own voice, I have decided that words and pictures set the tone considerably better. I'll start by introducing myself, then documenting what little history of the car that I know, then plow into "the rescue" and then document progress to date. After that, just like the awesome Jeff blog, I'll document progress as I go and be hitting you guru's up for advice on various things. About me: I'm Mike, and I grew up in the Bombala region of NSW, firstly right on the border south of there, then in Bombala itself and then a bit north of there where my parents still reside. Although not a native of the area (i was actually born in Wollongong), growing up on a farm in the middle of nowhere tends to make one super-practical and resourceful. I now live in Sydney where I use my resourcefulness in the IT field, but am constantly doing side projects or hobbies - everything from electronics, to building new mountain bikes to race, to playing golf etc. Zee History: As it turns out, my kid brother is an *actual* mechanic based in Canberra. He did his apprenticeship in Bombala in the mid 90's, where he bought this Datto off a local car enthusiast (who was also trying to offload a Bollwell at the time too). It had no engine, but was otherwise complete. My brother did the usually rear hatch slam plate rust restore (provided from the z factory in Vic), and bought an l24 engine from an engine builder in Newcastle. Apparently, the engine was designed and built for a particular class of the Bridge to Bridge boat race, and was designed to be supercharged. Being an apprentice, my brother couldn't afford a supercharger, so he shaved the head, changed the pistons and put triple delorto's on it. He also put in a brand new kmac suspension kit, some saas seats and a dodgy stereo system. And Jelly Bean wheels of course. The car was started, run in, and then parked outside on the farm where it sat for years. I bought it off him in about 2000 when I was living in London, and I think at around 2002 it moved into my parents hay shed. 2020 Bushfires: I had wanted to get the datto up to Sydney for years. When I moved to my new house in 2013, one of the pre-requesites was to have a big enough garage for me to work on the car. Unfortunately, for years, it contained all those boxes of stuff that we can't throw out but at the same time, never open. After slowly purging these and shuffling and reshuffling stuff in the garage, I made room for 2 cars! The next thing was getting it up here. Enter the bushfire season of 2019 / 2020. In Jan '20, my parents were literally surrounded by bushfires. The Vic fires had jumped the border and were heading north, and the Bega fires where heading south and south-west. And then, for kicks and giggles, a bushfire started at the other end of the Valley from my parents where burning leaves from the west were landing. So, like a scene out of almost every armageddon style of movie, I went south with my Daughter, driving through pea-soup smoke while every other human being was heading north. Yeah - a tad unnerving. With chainsaw in hand, I cleared and cleared and cleared, to first protect the house, the water tanks, then the sheds. The last thing on my list was to evaluate the Datsun. The Rescue: The 240Z was in the left bay of a 3 bay open hay shed. It was covered in bales of wool, and surrounded by wood. In the middle bay was all wood for the house that Dad built, and the right hand bay (where the northern fire was coming from) had hay in it. So, yeah - hay catches alight, burns the wood, and then takes out the Datto. Not a good scenario. To add fuel to the fire (so to speak), in front of the hay shed there were about 50 containers of used cooking oil from a failed bio-diesel experiment - just to add some more excitement to the predicament. I needed to get the Datto out of there. A hammer took care of the seized brake drums, and the tyres still kinda pumped up. The front seats were out of it, and there was 10mm of dust on the windscreen. A wombat had decided that the best place to dig its hole was under the front left wheel, and that covering the LHS in dirt was a cool thing to do. Wombats are like that. Dad got his tractor in behind it so we cold drag it out, but then the tractor broke down, blocking its exit. So, we executed a perfect 496 point turn by hand, and eventually got the old girl free. My daughter volunteered to be the first one to drive it - and by drive, I mean squatting in the front where the seat should have been, steering it while peering out of a window that you couldn't see through, while being ready to hit the brakes (that didn't work) to avoid running into the back of the outback that was towing it with some straps. What could possibly go wrong. But, with a sense of adventure and a bit of luck, we pulled it out and dragged it into the middle of a freshly plowed paddock, and heaped dirt around the tyres to stop cinders from getting in there and burning it down. The following weekend, we trailered it to Canberra, and then 2 weeks after that the fires finally hit my parents place. I'm glad to say that nothing burnt down except some fences and a wood trailer that dad left out in the bush somewhere. I feel for so many people who lost everything in those fires. A few weeks after that, Jo from Get My Ride trailered it from Canberra to Sydney, where I parked her, complete, in my Garage. It only took 20 years... Next day, my Son and I gave her a clean, scratched around a bit to ascertain the rust, and at the time I remember saying something like "wow - there's hardly any rust at all! I dodged that bullet!". If only I'd touched some wood... Next chapter - the engine, and putting together an inventory of work to be done. Cheers, Mike
    7 points
  18. KatoKid

    [Vic] Sakura Picnic

    Pretty impressive turnout today. Numbers of classic cars is dwindling and being replaced by late model luxobarges, not complaining just an observation. Managed to get a good early morning sunlight with some shadow of mine. Cars that tickled my fancy: 13B turbo RWD conversion Mighty Boy....not sure how legally legit but impressive build non the less. Looks like recent Safari Gold partly done resto. Ke70 Corolla with a turbo VG
    7 points
  19. Mike_F

    Fire Rescue 240Z

    Chapter 12 - Glacial Movement is still Movement Its been pretty slow progress on Z of late. I've been heading to and from Canberra every second weekend to visit my mother in hospital (yes, smoking causes strokes), race mountain bikes, help my brother with his house, and even found some time to visit CBR Jeff. With all of those km's being racked up on the car and the bikes, I have managed to move forward with Zee. I figure its better to do bits and pieces than do nothing at all. I welded the bonnet latch bracket back into place: I put RivNuts in place for the Battery Tray using my brothers broken RivNut tool (ie a Hex Bolt with a big free floating nut that to pull against): I have prepared the inside of the cowl area for some seam sealer, and I figured I would do some more seam sealing around the battery tray area (on both sides) where it meets the firewall. But, before I can do that I need to lay down some primer, so I cleaned up the engine bay a bit and primed half of it: Why didn't I just prime the whole engine bay while I was there? Well... 1. I hate having things half finished, and I want to finish the Cowl area off, which has a sequence to it which start with Seam Sealer. So that's priority. 2. I need to repair some of the bracket that the front guard hangs over - the same bracket that is welded onto the strut tower. 3. I would need to get the front suspension components off to do the engine bay in its entirety, which I don't want to do yet. This weekend I intend on being in Sydney, so I want to get a bunch more done - hopefully zip that cowl area up for good. I also want to make a start on that back RH guard now that I have the green repair panel from Columbia, which will remove much of the crumpled mess there. Now, onto a serious note. My mother has finally decided to stop smoking. She is 69 years old, and started smoking when she was about 9. But, unfortunately for my mother, this decision has come too late. In January, 1/3 of her brain was damaged as a result of the blood clot induced stroke. He left arm doesn't work, she's blind in her left eye, and her left leg isn't too good at the moment either - after about 3 months of rehab, she can struggle to pull herself from a seated to a standing position. While she still has her excellent sense of humour, her cognitive ability has suffered significantly - snakes and ladders is a big challenge, as are children's puzzles. She has a very long and tough road ahead of her (years of rehab), and so does my Dad who is always at her side. My message to our Z family: If you smoke, don't wait until a debilitating stroke forces you to reconsider your health choices - because by then its too late for both you and your loved ones who will be looking after you. Giving up smoking will not be easy - the nicotine receptors in your brain, which are like ticks that suck the life out of their host, will fight you at every step. But over time, you will starve them to death and their need for your smoking will become less and less. But, it will be worth it. You'll look back in amazement at how good you feel once you have given it up. And you will have a much better chance at living out your days healthy, and on your terms. Hopefully, for us, that means still hurtling our Z's along winding country roads, windows down, listening to that roar echoing through the trees as we shift back a gear and allow the engine to rev back up towards redline - Grinning from ear to ear as we do it. That should be our twighlight years - doing that, not wishing we could do that. Mike
    7 points
  20. Mike_F

    Fire Rescue 240Z

    Chapter 9 - Roofus Interruptus Last chapter we went in fast forward to cover the half-done rear hatch, and the fully done front guards. This chapter, I want to cover an area that I have been too afraid to do since the beginning - the upper corner of the windscreen and roof. Why have I been too afraid to tackle this? Well, when I took the sunroof out (yep - I've got one of those...) I noticed that the roof itself was paper thin! Welding onto this was going to be nigh impossible, and unfortunately I had a repair to do... However, I thought my skills had improved enough to give this a fairly solid crack. The question was around what technique was I going to use?? Looking at this part of the roof section, there are angles going in every dimension: The part that the windscreen rubber attaches to gently arcs downward. The next, horizontal part, got marginally thinner and also gently arched backwards, but forward again right at the corner. The top corner also gently arc's backwards, but also slightly downwards. The roof skin bit also changed its shallowness the closer to the edge it got. And, this was super visible, so getting it wrong would make Zee look like Frankensteiness. Once again, after assuming foetal position again for a while, I figured I should be able to create the patch without needing to cut into the roof. This was perfect, because it allowed me to have several attempts at the patch if I needed to, which took that part out of the "how to stuff up your car" equation. I used what I call "the Fitze method". Rather than trying to bend the piece in all of those dimensions (I just don't have that kind of skill ... yet), I decided it would be easier to make it out of 3 pieces - 1 for bottom, one of the vertical part, and one for the top. I started with the bottom, making a piece that slotted in perfectly over the existing spot-welded piece. I clamped it in place. Next was the vertical piece. I massaged it with a flap disk until it perfectly mated with the bottom bit, and then flexed it backward so it fit perfectly with the existing roof. This piece extends way past the roofline, but that is fine. I then created the roof patch, which I painstaking mated perfectly with the horizontal piece, and also clamped it in place. Like a diamond in the rough, it looked ugly but had the right angles to work with. I tacked it with the welder in many places (while clamped), then pulled it off and welded all of the corners a la Fitze method, and ground them back to the shape I wanted. The top edge is currently way to sharp, but its easier to make blunt than it is to sharpen... Next step was to cut the roof. I didn't need to go back very far, maybe 3/4 of an inch, but wanted to go along far enough that I had good metal to work with. Once that was done, I took a photo, then nuked the insides with S50 Cavity Wax (I'd run out of Eastwood Internal Frame Coating). pre-nuke Post nuke. That cavity wax gets into everywhere!! Once done, it was time to cut back my patch, then carefully massage it until it slotted in perfectly flush. Welding was done very slowly. Literally 2 spots at a time, then let cool until I could hold my hand on it. Then another 2 spots. I kept doing that until complete, then just as carefully flapped back the welds and dressed with anti-ox to stop from surface rusting. I think it came up well, and I was super proud of myself! I even "showed it off" to the Aussie Z facebook group. Front all finished (except for the corner welds which need cleaning up) Side View. Its at that point that Lurch noticed the high amount of surface rust under the roof skin, and strongly suggested I take the roof skin off. I spent a day in complete denial, and then relented because he was right - unless I deal with the cancer lurking under the roof skin, its just going to come back again. At which point, I enthusiastically moved onto the battery tray area! While that is the truth (the part about moving onto the battery tray), I'm actually procrastinating on the roof. I will do it, but I need to decide whether I want to keep the sunroof or not. If I don't want to keep the sunroof, then I have 2 choices: See if I can source another roof skin off a good quality parts car. (unlikely??) Create a patch for the sunroof hole, and bond it in place. (its way too thin to weld, and metal bonding is meant to be just as good these days). Or, I embrace the 70's, grow a mow, wear some vinyl, and keep the sunroof. Arg. Decisions decisions... So, next chapter my son and I get the Engine and Gearbox out (making the exact same mistake as Ryan did with the engine leveler) and then I find more rust with the added challenge that its kinda hard to get at.
    7 points
  21. Inside of the guards have now been painted with stonechip and colour. And the inside of the bonnet, doors and hatch are now in colour. I'm still waiting on the plating to come back from the electroplaters...
    7 points
  22. Mike_F

    Fire Rescue 240Z

    Chapter 4 - Well, Wheely Wusty Wheel Well. Last chapter, we finished taking stock of the rust that we could see. All in all, and compared to other 240Z's that I have seen on the internet, she's in pretty good shape. This chapter, I'm going to learn some basic metal fabrication and learn how to mig weld. Did I mention that my kid bro is an actual mechanic? Well, he used to also do construction work, and just so happened to have a spare mig welder which he gave me - a Lincoln 180 T. I was down at the 'bra helping my bro' with something or other, and he taught me the basics on how to weld. We made our first thing - a garage chair on wheels, with a motorbike seat. Apparently it still works, which I'm glad because if it failed ... I was using 0.8 flux core wire on some of the nastiest metal on the planet. This stuff is square tubing that is used to brace motorbikes when they are in transit from the factory. The theory was, if I can weld that, I can weld anything. So, I grabbed a bunch of it and took it home with me, and continued practicing and practicing and practicing. I knew I had progressed from Padawan to full on Jedi Master when I had completed this masterpiece: But, I was still way too scared to start cutting into the Datto. So, I went to my local metal scrap supplies and got some sheet metal that was used as a cover for an outdoor air conditioning unit. This stuff was ultra thin, I'm guessing 24 or 26 gauge. With 0.8 flux core, it may as well have been 100 gauge. So, I converted the welder over to 0.6 and put an Argon mix bottle on it, turned the welder down, and practiced my butt welding. After about half an hour of that, I gave up and decided to go back to using my hands. Anyhoo, after running out of metal to join together, and after watching every single utube video on the planet on how to do rust repairs on cars (there are some really dodgy people out there, on so many levels), I finally plucked up enough courage to have a go at the Datto. And when I say courage, it was a bit like the courage that the Lion had on Wizard of Oz. At the beginning. I decided to start in the spare wheel well. This was a brilliant idea, because if I stuffed it up, no-one will really see it anyway. This is what I had to contend with: I first fixed the bracket on top, as it was a tad rusted: And then started cutting out metal, bending and fabricating patches, welded them in, and ground back the welds. I'm not going to pretend it was all clear sailing, and I learnt A LOT (and at the same time, not enough), but ultimately produced this: ...and then I got completely carried away and created this: I got the VG Auto Paints guys to create the 918 colour in a rattle can (1 pack). Mostly because I wasn't actually sure if I liked the colour. But, as it turns out, I really like the colour. And since I did all of this work in a place that no-one will ever see, I had to take 100 photos of it and post it on every social media platform on the planet. Tick Tock has since banned me, and Grinder seemed to be more interested in my butt welding. Weird. Anyway, at this point I was brimming with confidence and eager to tackle the left hand rear dog leg. But beforehand, I felt it was prudent to take stock of the lessons learnt. So here goes... Don't get too excited with the welder. Its fun. But you need to keep the heat out of the panels. Find other things to tinker with while the steel is cooling - clean the tip of the welder, wire brush the welds, have a sip of tea, check how many likes you've got on your latest rusty patch photo on FB. Be patient. Don't be stingy on the amount of rust to cut out. It super hard to weld new metal to ultra-thin crappy metal, and it'll probably blow holes in it anyway. Just cut it out and weld new stuff to good stuff. Its quicker, easier and will be better quality. Related, do a big patch instead of lots of small patches. Its quicker, its easier to get right and it looks better. Its important to fine tune your patch before welding it in. If you get the angles wrong or you mis-align an edge its near impossible to fix later. Don't get too emotionally attached to your patch, because if it looks like its not going to work you need to be willing to throw it away and start again. Don't try to push a bad position. Gap or no gap on a butt weld. I too'd and fro'd on this one, but I think I am leaning more towards no gap. The problem with a gap is that when the weld cools, it shrinks. And when it shrinks, it pulls and twists the metal all around it. Then you have to squish the weld with a hammer and dolly to get the distortion back out. But with tight edges, when the panels heat they expand and push against each other, pushing up or down. Dunno. I thought metal expanded. I didn't realise it shrinks. And when it does, it kinda sucks because it pulls your delicate curves out. Going slow, stopping and letting the panel to cool minimises the shrinkage. Don't be too generous on the extra metal on the patch. It's just more cutting that will required. Live on the edge! Run a short stick and more wire speed when welding upside down. More Voltage produces much nicer welds, but requires good metal. See 2. When red hot welding stuff spits over your visor, into your hair and starts burning your scalp, calmly saying "ouch" very loudly dulls the pain enough to allow you to complete your weld without stopping. Don't weld in thongs. Ask me how I know. If your welding sucks, which it will at the beginning, be good at grinding/flap disc work. Welding too close to molybdenum magnets creates really, really bad welds. Using Magnets to hold your patches in place is awesome. Using Magnets to hold your patches in place is a living hell. Metal shaping is fun. Really, it is. Its so rewarding. Remember, learning is a journey. Enjoy the journey. Next Chapter, I learn all about "the iceberg" effect.
    7 points
  23. JDM-TOY

    The Build 73 240Z

    After 3 years of waiting and waiting today I can say the 240z has officially headed home. What a wait and mission with many ups and downs and more ups and downs till it finally got done. Still have a few things I would like to get stuck into myself before I get the wiring and interior sorted such as brake lines, callipers, turbo hoses and what every I can try do myself. Hopefully after the 240z gets engineered I will get the car polished and ceramic coated to protect that paint. Sooo beautiful
    7 points
  24. It's taken a while as my painter is busy but he's also being quite diligent, but it's now got it's first of two coats of high build primer. This first coat will be sanded down, then the next coat will be applied. Engine bay, interior and underbody will be painted wet on wet in colour in a week or two. Then it comes back to me to have the driveline fitted etc. Then it goes back for its topcoat... Exciting times!
    7 points
  25. AK

    Ak Build

    Just a few Complete photos - Done Now. GOING TO HAVE REST NOW!
    7 points
  26. We plan on making just about every metal part for the S30z...the idea is to eventually make the whole car, if there is the market demand...just to give you an example, right now we have just about every part available to make a complete VW deluxe bus...we make close to 1,200 parts for the vintage VW buses....we hope to do the same with the S30z....
    7 points
  27. gav240z

    WTB: 240z/260z

    This is probably just bait. But I can't help myself.. since I love a good game of tennis. Spare a thought for us long term enthusiasts a minute, every other day some flat brimmed hat wearing, vape smoking, soy latte drinking, YOLO kid, joins up looking for a 240z/260z (2seaters ONLY PLEASE)* and hoping they will get a rust free, straight, RB25 400HP + conversion car, fully engineered, DID I SAY rust free car? for $20k? Oh and they have been looking for 6 months and have got sick of looking in the classifieds and want it all spoon fed to them. But first they want to offer their doomsday example of an S13 coupe which has been put into every wall at the drift track with a massive dildo gearknob pic as 1 of the key selling points. * Oh btw 2+2's are a strict no no, because it won't score you enough instagram internet points when slammed on its guts with massive flares, cheap eBay fender mirrors, LED tail lamps, massive bright red Recaro's and a straight pipe exhaust affectionately known as "blast pipes". But of course we the owners are the "wankers". :). According to Hayden's book of collectible sports cars from the 60's/70's and 80's? Someone paid $300k for an old Ford Falcon covered in Chicken Shite. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-30/rare-ford-falcon-sells-for-300k-after-30-years-in-shed/12503282 And you're complaining about S30Z prices? LOL, ok good luck with that. I actually really hope you get a good car. But let me just say I've seen a lot of these HLS30's in the flesh. They are often in far worse shape than HS30s but look "good in photos". In person it's another deal all together. Prices in the US have been rising and a car that cheap is unlikely to be any good. Plus it's resale value in this part of the world will be lower. Not really, when you consider there is none on the market anymore. In terms of classic cars compared to many of their peers they still represent good buying. Whilst central banks keep printing money (they call this stimulus) it will just keep inflating asset prices (seen the price of gold or BTC lately?). What about real estate? They are viewed as a bit of a safe haven asset. Unlike that Mustang you crowed about which is a depreciating asset at this point in the cycle. You can also buy a Z34 for $20k now, but nobody seems to want those, despite probably being better than an early Z at everything. Except turning heads. :). I like it when the new guys make an effort to fit in. :). I can understand the sentiment if you've missed out on the price boom. I am still upset I didn't jump on a GTR (R32/R33 or R34 in particular). I thought R34 GTRs were expensive at $40k back in 2012 odd. I was like I'll wait a bit longer and prices will come down a bit more. Never happened though! Now I kick myself lol. Such is life.
    7 points
  28. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    Commencing 2021...
    6 points
  29. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    I decided to remove the plate inside the plenum that reinforces the pedal box mounts on the inside - no exactly easy to get at, but I eventually got it removed: Tasty... I wire brushed the area, then I make a repair patch to follow the curves, cut the rusted section out and welded in the new piece into place.
    6 points
  30. Back in 2019 I was contacted by a gentleman called Evan. And he had a problem. He'd been all over the eastern suburbs of Melbourne trying to find a panel beater / crash repair shop that would be interested repairing his 260Z, but every shop he's been to - once they'd seen the photos of his 260Z - told him they weren't interested or simply couldn't help. Yasee, back in 1995 Evan was driving his '76 260Z 2-seater through an intersection in Melbourne on a green light, when from his left a motorcyclist on a sports bike ran the red light and collided with the LH front of Evan's beloved 260Z. Upon hitting the LH wheel of the Z, the motorcycle lunched into the air and landed on the bonnet. The motorcyclist himself then 'supermaned' down the road 30 meters before reacquainting himself with the ground. He wasn't very happy, but apparently he lived. However the 260Z was immobilized - badly. After clearing the accident scene the Z was returned to Evan once insurance was paid out (all of $3000 in '95!), and it was put into storage for the next 24 years... When Evan contacted me he told me this story, and explained that he wanted to repair the 260Z and get it back on the road. And amazingly it was still in the same resting place when it was parked in '95! However, Evan and his wife had moved to a warmer climate in southern NSW and they were wanting to sell the house where the 260Z was stored, so some urgency in moving the Z was made clear. After being sent the photos I could clearly see why non-one wanted to take the repairs on... Yet I formulated a plan with Evan and agreed to fix it, but it would be a 'Friday Job' only and we'd take 12 months to fix it as we had other projects on the go. In late '19 Evan dropped the 260Z down to me - it wasn't pretty... The photos are from when we installed it up on the Autobench, and it really shows how badly damaged the body was. This hole is from the Aircleaner wingnut! Clearly this was not a small job...
    6 points
  31. With the radiator support straightened and ready to go back in, I paused in reinstalling it as the LH engine bay chassis rail was looking decidedly unfit for purpose... While I thought about repairing it, the amount of rust flakes and powder that come out of it while pulling it all back straight, and the fact that'd it'd probably lost all it's structural integrity, led me to the conclusion that it really should be replaced. With no rails available, I asked my mate Joel to draw the rails up in CAD. We'd then have them Lazar cut & CNC folded. While that was happening, we unpicked the rail from the Z, cleaned everything up, shrunk some of the inner skirt back into position and prepped for the new rail to be installed. With the new rails arriving, one was assembled ready for installation: This was duly fettled into place and welded into position: And finally the radiator support was welded back in after much farnarkling... Then the guards went back on along with the bonnet to check the gaps. Off the chassis bench for the first time in a year! Front suspension back in and it was back on the ground! A full year of Fridays had passed by this stage, so I asked Even what he's like to do next - did he want to collect his 260Z...?
    6 points
  32. Some more pictures as the rebuild process begins!
    6 points
  33. NickF

    Rear valance

    Got one thanks to Locky
    6 points
  34. So we finally picked up the car, and needless to say, it did not disappoint~! Best view of the day! <3 They changed the angle of the motor and raised the drivers side by around 20mm, to assist with sump clearance and to get the gearbox dead flat. Gearbox crossmember was nice and compact. Secured on the other side with 2 small plates with 2 bolts each side. Clearance is now great with the change they made. Test fit for the filters, Clearance <3 Thanks for tuning in Time to get moving with the rest~!
    6 points
  35. update Its a big one! ooh baby ~! And to finish it off my favourite! <3 432R style muffler! So now we are up to date! as of the 31st of January 2021. Tomorrow ~ Monday morning I am picking the car up from the fab shop and am going to push to get this done and running and on the road by May! PS : sorry picture heavy!
    6 points
  36. I have been a long time lurker and thought I would introduce myself. I have owned a Blue 71 240z (VIN HS3001303) for about 20 years. This was a rare car as it had a white vinyl roof which appeared to have factory or dealer installed. About 10 years ago the vinyl roof finally dried out and started cracking. I decided I would strip the car down and remove the Vinyl roof and tidy up the shell and give it a refresh. Due to panel beater issues and Ipurchasing a new toy to play (Mitsubishi Starion Rally Car) lost motivation. Yes I am ashamed. About a month ago I had the opportunity to buy another Datsun 240z Red (VIN HS3001523) from a longtime motorsport competitor. This car has the original engine from my blue Zed. I am glad to say I have rekindled my love of the 240zs. My aim is to give the red 240z a once over mechanically and a bit of cosmetic TLC and keep driving it. In the background I want to get the blue cars shell repaired / restored and reassembled and reunite it the blue 240z with its original engine. I am in Newcastle so if any one can recommend panel beater in the Newcastle / Sydney area it would be greatly appreciated.
    6 points
  37. C.A.F.

    Project: Factory Fresh

    Thanks for the comments everyone ☺️ One thing I will add that's not in the photos - the exhaust. The original secondary's were still there(!), but it was badly welded to a horrible ugly steel press bent rear section with bypass mufflers fitted. The rear muffler was rusted out, so I spoke to the owner about a new system... I carefully cut away the old system from where it joined the secondary's, then Tig welded on a step joint. Following this I had the secondary's media blasted, then I gave them a coat of exhaust paint. The rest of the new system I made out of 304 stainless steel 2inch mandrel bends, with straight through 2inch mufflers. I even retrofitted the original(!) S/S tip - this had managed to stay on the car all these years! Even though it's a straight through system it's still nice and quiet. And it'll never rust!
    6 points
  38. JDM-TOY

    The Build 73 240Z

    Finally progress on paint work. Panels should be going on to the car tomorrow so should have more pictures to come. Giddy Up
    6 points
  39. It's not Datsun or S30Z specific. I am tracking several cars on CarSales (thanks to the star icon you can save certain cars) - it's my little wish list. :). Anyway I get notifications daily of price moves. Majority of prices are being pushed up and not down, especially for 90s JDM stuff, but also early rotary and other Datsun's, Toyota's etc.. GTRs are out of control. The real problem I see is that you have the RBA talking of dropping rates further to 0.1% and more talk of QE, but even though the RBA denies it (like they denied the next move in rates was down), it's likely they will try negative interest rates as other places have done in the world. Despite the evidence suggesting it doesn't work, it won't stop them trying. When there is no return on your money in the bank, you funnel it into anything that provides a return, which could be vintage cars and other assets (deemed low risk). Of course you could argue this is the intention of such policies to encourage people to spend etc.. but I see it as a dead end and I have no idea where the madness ends. The only reason I'd sell any of my Toys at this stage would be to get the Mortgage paid off. As to when / if JobSeeker/Keeper ending will encourage more liquidity. It will be interesting, but I suspect people on JobSeeker were not buying Datsun's. Unless their name was Hayden of course.
    6 points
  40. R.I.P Rudi Condolences to all my Auszcar family.... Rudi might as well be gone for good... well, for a few months at least! Welcome the new addition to the clan!! Wife had to have a Emergency cesarean, very scary, she lost heaps of blood.... But we made it! Baby Alexis, She was born on 17.9.20! 3.8kg! 4 days old now, this is the first time I've been able to turn on my computer! We got home 2 days ago, mum is recovering well but its slow and i have to do 80% of things for her which is hard. I'll tell ya! I'm learning fast! Bub is doing fine. I had... uhh.... 1 hour sleep on Saturday night, was able too get about 4 last night Hopefully i can see you all again in a few months haha! . Rudi.
    6 points
  41. C.A.F.

    Project: Factory Fresh

    With the body finally(!) done, I installed it onto the dolly (that I borrowed off Gav): Then I decided I better take a look at the guards, doors and hatch... Hatch was perfect. The doors were sound, but had some unsightly surface rust on the inside, so I sanded, rust converted, then KBS'd the inside of them. Guards... Well they weren't happy. The top mounting tab that is hidden under the scuttle panel was - rather oddly - rusted though on both, so I refabricated those sections, cut the old ones off and rewelded the new one into position. (For some reason I didn't get a photo of the repairs). Then I had a look at the lower guard sections - yep there was bog: Nothing else to do but cut it out, fabricate a new section and weld it in: Rinse and repeat on the LH Side: (Finished photo missing :\ )
    6 points
  42. Hi all Names Ryan, I have been a lurker on here for a very many years now. I am the long time owner of a 1971 240z here in Perth. Vin is HS30-001063 I have owned the car for 10 years. When I bought the car it was in rough condition, tried to get it running to enjoy for a while but the previous owner had neglected it too much. So I decided not to waste money or time and wait for a ground up resto. Then it took me 8 years to find a decent space to start the resto (my dads new shed). I started the tear down in late 2018 but then had my son so it went on the back burner for another 1.5 years. Now I am almost finished the tear down and excited to get some real work done. Unfortunately I have another baby due in November! Damn! Lol Will be starting a build thread shortly and hope to do lots of updates. We’ll see..... ;p I have also started a YouTube channel to document the restoration. At the moment they’re pretty boring dismantle videos but I plan to make them better quality and more exciting in the future. Your support would mean the world to me! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHZhre0vm7sL2Kl7hUQFVkg
    6 points
  43. Over the last month we have made some more progress. Most notably passenger door, fenders and interior. Its was so excited seeing the door and the fenders on the car.
    6 points
  44. cracker

    WTB: 240z/260z

    Hayden why are you posting on a zed forum ripping into zed prices? Think you may have to pick your crowd better. As a somewhat relevant aside, someone is not a wanker simply because they want a lot of money for their car. Documented sale prices have proven values are higher than what they were so to deny that is just burying your head in the sand. Prices changes and time moves on. A cheap zed used to be $1000.. then it was $5k. Now a cheap zed is $30k. Sale prices are not made up, they are a result of people making informed decisions with their cold hard earned cash. I'd suggest you jump on the ET pulsar forum if you are just going to rip into owners on this forum because you can no longer afford one. Ps. A Mustang is faster, newer, has better tech, even bluetooth, nice cold AC and lovely powerful V8 - but none of those are reasons why you buy a zed.
    6 points
  45. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    It's starting... Some of the panels from KFVintage have arrived...
    5 points
  46. Mike_F

    Fire Rescue 240Z

    Chapter 2: Immortal Engines Last chapter, we rescued Zee from a potential death by inferno, and a few weeks later we had her washed and safely tucked away in the Tardis of a Garage. The next step is to try to ascertain what work is going to be involved in getting her registered. My first point of call was the engine, partially because I was more familiar with mechanics and because I had higher confidence this was going to be fine and really just wanted to tick this off. To do something like this, I was going to need a helper - luckily, I have a 15 year old son. So I dragged him away from computer games and forced him to get his hands filthy dirty. Firstly, I had to duck to the shops to get some parts - a battery, new oil, some fresh fuel, new spark plugs, new oil filter, new fuel filter and some coolant system cleaner. After that, I wanted to ensure that the engine spun, and that the valves went down and actually came back up again. So, out with the radiator, off with the tappet cover and out with the spark plugs. I sprayed some lubricant into each cylinder, and then turned the engine by hand (with a socket and breaker bar). To my delight, it turned, and we checked that every single valve went up and down, at least twice. We put some oil into the top end for good measure, just to make sure everything was nicely lubed. Next was fuel. I drained the 40 litres of 20 year old "super" out of the tank (putting it into 2 x 20 litre containers ... what do I do with that?), and put in 5 litres of fresh stuff. We hooked up the battery and gave the ignition key a turn. I was hoping to hear the fuel pump make a noise (there is an electric fuel pump on this) but there was nothing. I cranked the engine a few times but still nothing. We undid the fuel hose on the carby side of the fuel pump, cranked again and still nothing. So, off with the fuel pump where we sprayed carby cleaner in it, tapped it a few times with a hammer and checked that it worked. We then reassembled into the car, and like magic, we had fuel. So, with radiator back in, tappet cover back on and spark plugs in their holes, it was time to get fuel into the carbs. I was expecting to completely tear down the carbs (I may still have to), so when I gave the car a bit of a crank to get fuel into the carbs, I was a bit surprised to hear a "da-da-dum" sound coming from the engine, indicating that Zee was keen to start. But Wait! I need to stop and think about the consequences of this! What if the oil pump wasn't working? What if an oil gallery was blocked? What about coolant? Did the thermostat work? What else hadn't I thought of that could break and ruin my engine? 0.28 seconds later, I did 3 quick pumps of the accelerator and gave it another crank! It started! It was a bit rough at first, most likely as it burnt out the stuff I squirted into the cylinders, and all manner of extractor rust was coming out of the muffler-less exhaust, but it ran! After about a minute or so, it not only ran, but it purred! I gave a few blips of the throttle and it responded nicely, sounding a little like a bus admittedly, but it sounded perfect! Looking in the engine bay, there was no alarming smoking or horrible knocks, just the gentle rattling of the tappets and the ridiculous whirring of the Gilmer Drive (yes - you read that correctly). I turned it off, then my son and I hi-fived each other half a dozen times - you couldn't get the grins off our faces! We dropped the oil, replaced the filter and put new oil in it, replaced the water and fired it up again, for no reason whatsoever other than to hear her purr again! I then noticed copious amounts of water running out from under the car. Strangely, the water didn't seem to be coming from the engine or the radiator, but instead was coming from the hole in the drivers side floor. Huh? I employed some yoga and back twisting/arching in order to get my head under the dash only to find that the hoses going into the heater core were, well, hosed. So, back off to the shop to get a temporary new heater hose, and then I went super lazy and just bipassed the heater core altogether. Another restart, and it was still purring, but this time without the pouring. I noticed, this time, that there was blue smoke coming out of the back. It may have been the new oil (maybe too light), or maybe (and most likely) the valve stem seals were also perished. I also noticed that the radiator got super hot and start expelling the water out of the relief hole (I think), to which I am optimistically putting it down to a screwed thermostat. It's always good to be optimistic, right? My thoughts at this point, in mid January 2020, was that "this was going to be easy". I was already imagining myself driving along the curves of the old pacific highway, with that straight six sound echoing through the trees, feeling the road through my hands as I swept from one corner to the next! But first, we needed to pull up the carpet and take off the panels to see if there was any rust, other than that small hole near the passenger door on the rocker panel near the dogleg... And that's for the next chapter!
    5 points
  47. This is why that WA 1975 260z 2 seater could be a bargain to the right person, even at the 80/90k valuations that people on here were shy to publicly suggest. I can see the appeal to getting a cheaper running car and slowly improving/restoring it, but realistically it's not going to approach anywhere near the same level of restoration without taking it off the road and spending a lot of money and/or time. If the difference in asking price is so small, that just doesn't make as much sense and it kind of explains the prices of restored S30s of all types we've been seeing lately on the international market.
    5 points
  48. As promised a few photos. Jeff
    5 points
  49. When the Z first arrived in the shop and I removed the bonnet I noticed the rust around the battery tray. Pretty unsightly... And that chassis rail doesn't look to happy either... So with the engine bay gutted, I decided to tackle this next. As predicted - rust holes: And with the tray removed... And onto the repairs: Unfortunately I didn't get photos of the repairs from the section further up, but you get the idea.
    5 points
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