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  1. Just an FYI, everyone has messaged me about this. Both are spammers from Russia, accounts deleted and all messages with it. RaskM and Orange15. I will run some software updates soon(new release within the last week) to see if that will help keep them out for next time.
    8 points
  2. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    After a bit of farnarkling and swearing, the RH Funky Green floorpan is in. LH Side is next...
    7 points
  3. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    I decided to remove the plate inside the plenum that reinforces the pedal box mounts on the inside - no exactly easy to get at, but I eventually got it removed: Tasty... I wire brushed the area, then I make a repair patch to follow the curves, cut the rusted section out and welded in the new piece into place.
    6 points
  4. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    With the RH side completed I turned my attention to the LH side of the plenum: So I fabricated a repair section, cannibalized the duct fitting from the old panel, then prepped and welded it to the new panel.
    5 points
  5. It's been over a month, but we haven't been idle with Evans 260Z... Graeme has repaired the LH side of the taillight panel: And he also cut off the doglegs and found the ends of the LH sill behind remarkably sound: The RH fared a little worse though but its nothing we cant fix. But that amount of fibre filler in front of the dogleg panel in the sill was a little strange - why was it there? I didn't spot it, but Graeme did: On close inspection the 260Z had been in a serious accident early in it's life and the whole RH rear quarter panel had been replaced! Its been done so well, only a couple of clues give it away. This explains the sill, but why they decided to fill the sill instead of pull the dent out is anyone guess - although I suspect the repair quote didn't leave enough $ to effect a proper repair.
    5 points
  6. So got a little bit done this week, was distracted by the company of @AndBir and @RestoZ. It’s amazing how 4 hours can disappear just talking about z’s! Managed to remove the rear valance panel! Great Success! Used a combination of methods. These are the first spot welds I’ve ever removed so wanted to try them all. Used the rotabroach cutter style, the specialty drill bit type and the finger file sander. This is what my experience was with each: Rota broach/cutter type I used this specific set so not the el cheapo type off eBay. I found these difficult to use, they don’t work well on plug welds which I had a few of. they like to walk on uneven surfaces. But if your panel is flat and they are factory spot welds these do ok. You must use a center punch the specialty drill bit type this worked really well and I preferred them to the cutter style. Cut quickly and don’t mind uneven surfaces, don’t walk on you either. best on factory spot welds, they didn’t do well on the plug welds due to the small diameter. Must use a center punch too the finger file sander Bought this specific one from bunnings 60$, wanted a cheap one to try out to see if it would be worth the money buying a more expensive air one once I get my compressor. And it is great for grinding out spot welds! Catch is it will leave massive square holes in the top panel, but if you’re not reusing the top panel this is a great option. It’s very quick, I was using 40grit, easy to see when you have ground enough of the spot weld away, leaves the bottom panel in perfect condition. This one did the job but lacked a bit of power, occasionally stopped turning if you put too much pressure on but made up for it with its light weight. Had to remove the clips that hold the.... I’ve had a mental blank.... rear dress up panels that go around the tail lights. As I will be using the whole of the repair panel which will require a cut along the top edge where those clips sit. As expected it’s rather rusty in the box section behind, some rust has made it all the way through. comparison of stock valance vs Auto panel solutions repair panel. High quality product. RHS looks like it has a minor nudge. Some rudimentary measurements show it’s out by 3-4mm. Not too bad. I’m thinking a big hammer should convince it. First mock up of the panel. Need to buy more vice grips for convincing it into position. next up I plan to: - convince the panel into position then test fit the automobile rear bumper to make sure there are no dramas there - mark and cut top edge where panel will end up - clean up the box section, carry out repairs on the rust holes - kbs rust blast then kbs rust seal the internal box section
    5 points
  7. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    And when are you going to buy said Z?
    4 points
  8. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    With the plenum to panel sides repaired... I tapped it with a hammer and the panel came off: And this is the reason I removed it - I needed access to repair this: Onwards........
    4 points
  9. RestoZ

    HS30-00211

    That's Lucky without a U
    4 points
  10. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    RH side was next, so the door was gapped so I had something to compare the gaps too. And the bad repairs: Nothing for it, but to start cutting it all out: And then start reinstalling the funky green panels: Outer sill on, bottom of A post repaired and welded back in along with the bottom of the B post: While I was installing the sills, I had one of my guys - Paul - straighten the original LH guard as it had been beaten around more than a honeymooners wedding tackle: Floors are next...
    4 points
  11. Some more photos from Locky. The dash was put in to turn the engine over. It comes out again as we still have the gauges to clean and the clock is having modern (more reliable) internals installed by a Melbourne instrument maker. The new: vents, dash emblem, heater panel etc will go in when that comes back. Meanwhile, the new shift knob reproduction I ordered is sitting in place now on top of the short throw conversion gearbox with brass synchros…going to be nice in the change!
    4 points
  12. This is a very old thread by now, but I found this relevant pic elsewhere and thought it may be of interest to some. The event was the 1975 Alpine Rally in Vic. Jeff
    4 points
  13. gav240z

    Classic car bubble

    https://www.rx7club.com/2nd-generation-non-technical-pictures-198/funny-inspiration-posters-832116/
    3 points
  14. AndBir

    HS30-00211

    And how many of our cars have this insidious rust "infection" quietly eating away from the inside out? - the answer is all of them - it just varies as to how extensive it is :-( And sellers on Carsales want you to pay ~$100k when you have no idea as to what is happening under the shell of the car - crazy!
    3 points
  15. gav240z

    Evie 1972 Datsun 240z

    Finally got a set of new covers to match my lenses. Funny enough there are 2 different versions of rings and lens. I actually had 2 rings with a lens (minor cracks) but they were a mismatched pair.. which would have meant drilling holes in different locations for each headlight bucket on a car. Plus if I ever needed a replacement I'd need to order an odd lens and normally they would be sold as matched pairs I'd imagine. Thing is the lenses themselves are different shapes and so even if I redrilled holes in the lenses, they can't be interchanged. Refer to photos. Before I can fit these I'll need to source some rubber gasket / seals and the mounting hardware. Which I'm sure I've seen somewhere for purchase, just gotta remember where.
    3 points
  16. Depends which way it's gone.
    3 points
  17. peter t

    Go Karts

    Hi just thought seeing as my 2+2 gets called a bus I am going to call 2 seaters "GO KARTS" in the future. LOL.
    3 points
  18. Car sounds like an very old pet dog : "..does not run, but does turn itself over.."
    3 points
  19. 240ZBUILTBYME

    HS30-00211

    Thank god for this rusty car. It’s rusty in all the same spots as mine! So I get to see how it needs to be done! Well done Lachy without a U
    2 points
  20. hmd

    Classic car bubble

    why worry about fuel comsumption when it spend most of its time at the mechanic
    2 points
  21. gav240z

    HS30-00211

    This is why I like to buy the cleanest car possible to begin with... Because otherwise you're doing exactly what is being done here. Everything!
    2 points
  22. The floors pans in the 260Z had unpleasant ventilation holes and they were generally a bit beaten around. They really needed to be replaced, but replacement pans for a later RS30 were not available - until KFVintage came to the rescue again with hand made floors and rails becoming available just in time. Graeme made a jig to hold the seat rails in position, then had the laborious task of unpicking them from the floors. They were welded in so thoroughly that each side to many hours to cleanly remove. After waiting for the replacement floor pans and rails to be made and sent, they arrived after a few weeks and Graeme set about cutting out the LH floor.
    2 points
  23. Up, 280zx only go up in value from this point on.
    2 points
  24. C.A.F.

    Go Karts

    OK Boomer.
    2 points
  25. Just wanted to post my results using the profile mentioned by AndBir to replace my rock hard window rubbers. I actually bought the length required from here for $60 - https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/233226011571?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649 Looks very similar to the profile CBR Jeff got from zcarsource, and is nicely flocked on the window wiper. I ground off the staples holding my old rubbers to the stainless and used 3.2mm (4.8mm depth) aluminium rivets to install the new rubbers. I think they turned out really well, so many thanks to AndBir for the tip which spurred me on to finally do something about them.
    2 points
  26. Thank you gents, I know a little more now, especially that the seats in my car are rarer than previously thought… Careful, it's not a Zed
    2 points
  27. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    The footwells will be repaired at a later time... Today I started on the plenum top & got the RH side repaired, less the inspection flap mount: LH side next week...
    2 points
  28. C.A.F.

    HS30-00211

    LH floor is now complete:
    2 points
  29. hmd

    Classic car bubble

    because Porsche owners are obsessed with 911. How many time have I told you to buy a 944 turbo (951).
    2 points
  30. AndBir

    Classic car bubble

    If the production and use of petrol vehicles falls dramatically I wonder what the impact on petrol prices will be. Will less demand result in higher overall cost of production per litre and/or refineries closing?
    2 points
  31. I spent 7 years doing FiFo work Aus<->Sthn Africa and did once happen across a truck hijack in progress when driving to Johannesburg from the Free State. The guys got out of a small Datsun ute with their 9mm pistols drawn just as I drove past the truck in my "non-amoured" Hilux - needless to say I stamped on the accelerator and never looked back! Too many guns in South Africa - probably similar to the USA?
    2 points
  32. Very Off topic - "Window selection criteria". And I thought it was only important to have stone chip resistant glass :
    2 points
  33. gav240z

    Classic car bubble

    The M-spec NUR (Silver car) may not have sold. Sometimes ads get taken down because they become stale after a while and so sometimes they resurface or finance falls over etc.. so just because it's placed on hold doesn't mean it's actually sold. With regard to GTRs I've noticed quite a few cars listed have had recent price drops. Sydney lockdown and other states etc.. must be having some kind of impact on people's finances and without JobKeeper/JobSeeker and early access to Super like last year I'd say stimulus money is somewhat running dry... However access to home equity to buy shiny things may still be a thing for some... I must admit I contemplated it momentarily, but decided perhaps not a good idea. I feel R34 prices may have topped out for a while , but I thought that about house prices 10 years ago.. egg on my face.
    2 points
  34. hmd

    Classic car bubble

    @gav240z Mr ed scissorhands ?
    2 points
  35. There's no 'secrets' young Padawan - just new technology in products and equipment, along with new procedures to complement them. I'm fortunate as my spray painter is a master of his trade and is always at the forefront. Furthermore, everything that we do can be done by oneself at home in oneself's shed/garage - it's not inaccessible to those outside the trade. I'll consider writing a post about how I go about painting a classic car...
    2 points
  36. I can just see Lauchlan/Locky/CAF sitting back with his bucket of pop corn with a massive grin across his face as this discussion develops. Just to add to the mix this link provides some further insight into urethane primers: https://www.autobodysupply.net/Articles.asp?ID=139 My advice, right or wrong, was that using etch, followed by acrylic urethane primer when applying a clear over base finish was the best approach. There is more than one way to skin this cat and it all comes down to choosing a method and applying the associated advice and rules. Now where's my pop corn?
    2 points
  37. Yep, I've been door to door racing in historic group S for the last 6 years with stock brake setup.
    2 points
  38. As Jon said above, the brakes can be changed at any stage in the future if Jon requires an upgrade. People think standard Z brakes are crap on the road, but then you cant compare worn out 50yo brakes to new ones... I'm now waiting on my painter to have a spot open up in the next few weeks, so the Z is paused for the moment.
    2 points
  39. gav240z

    Classic car bubble

    It may never be matching numbers again but I find this car even more interesting because of its history. This is why I like putting together the HS30 registry / gallery / albums because they help us out together the gaps and sometimes track down missing cars. It would be very satisfying to find where HS30 00003 is for example..
    2 points
  40. JDM-TOY

    Classic car bubble

    Always the greatest https://www.motorbiscuit.com/the-datsun-240z-one-of-the-greatest-sports-cars-ever-made/
    2 points
  41. 100% agree, there is so much conflicting or more accurately confusing information for people who have not done this sort of thing before and probably never will again :-)
    2 points
  42. Agreed that metal treatment and automotive repair products are improving all the time and becoming more environmentally friendly. Most important is to ensure that all selected products - be they metal treatments, body fillers, sealers and all coatings - are compatible. This I know, having seen issues belatedly arise with older and not so old restorations. You must do your own research on the products you think to use. I've often seen difficulties with product adhesion on steelwork so for my purposes I prefer completely clean steel and have the zinc in the protective etch primer as part of the overall selected paint system. To each his own. Agreed though, need the zinc. But whatever systems car restorers choose to use these days they will undoubtedly be a vast improvement over factory practices of the past and old restorations and probably preserve the cars well past their own lifetimes.
    2 points
  43. I am sure we all would like our cars to have the rust protection that is present on todays vehicles, so maybe an understanding of todays car manufacturer paint process would help. Of course this is just based on Google searches and not first hand industry experience. History of Protecting the Automotive Body (https://www.paint.org/coatingstech-magazine/articles/brief-history-automotive-coatings-technology/) Topcoat technology was steadily improving for automotive coatings systems, but cars still had a major issue—rusting of the automotive body. A major coatings advance in the 1970s resolved this issue: electrodeposition primers, commonly known as “e-coat.” The first automotive electrocoat was an anodic product developed by Dr. George Brewer at Ford around 1957. However, there were drawbacks in the technology and PPG Industries introduced the first cathodic e-coat system for automotive bodies in 1973. Because these coatings essentially stop the automotive body from rusting, this new primer technology one was of the biggest breakthroughs in automotive coatings technology. Modern electrocoat automotive primers are applied by totally submerging the assembled car body in a large tank that contains the waterborne e-coat, and the coating is applied through cathodic eletrodeposition. This assures nearly 100% coverage of all metal surfaces by the primer. The coating chemistry is waterborne enamel based on epoxy, an aminoalcohol adduct, and blocked isocyanate, which all crosslink on baking to form an epoxy-urethane resin system. This resin technology, combined with the excellent coverage provided by electrodeposition, delivers one of the most effective coatings for corrosion protection known. Virtually all cars use e-coat technology as the foundation of their coating system today. Process Overview : (http://www.ppgecoat.com/Process.aspx) The electrocoat process can be divided into four distinct sections: Pretreatment: Parts are cleaned and pretreated with a conversion coating to prepare the part for electrocoating. Electrocoat Tank: Direct current is applied between the parts and a "counter" electrode. Paint is attracted by the electric field to the part where it is deposited. Post Rinses: Parts are rinsed to reclaim undeposited paint solids. Bake Oven: Paint is thermally cross-linked or cured. Pretreatment Process for Electrocoat Paint Application : (http://www.ppgecoat.com/Process/Pretreatment.aspx) In the pretreatment process, metal surfaces are cleaned and prepared for electrocoat paint application. Oils and other contaminants are removed from the part. Existing rust spots may be removed and a phosphate or conversion coating is applied. The pretreatment process is necessary to improve electrocoat performance, ensure a high quality electrocoat finish and to keep the paint bath clean of unwanted contaminants. The number and type of pretreatment stages depends greatly on the type and condition of metal being introduced to the system. It also depends on the part configuration and the overall performance requirements of the phosphate or conversion coating. Zinc and iron phosphates are the most widely used conversion coatings in the electrocoat industry. Zinc phosphate is the preferred pretreatment choice in the electrocoat industry because it provides the best corrosion resistance and paint adhesion.. So, if this theory is still valid for manual (spray/brush) application of primer then repairs/repainting should involve: 1) Manual removal of coatings (rust/paint) down to freshest possible bare metal 2) Clean all surfaces with your preferred degreaser 3) Apply your preferred surface treatment to produce a zinc phosphate coating on the metal 4) Apply your preferred sealer coat (for non exposed area KBS Rust Seal seems to be a good option with atmospheric cured resins).
    2 points
  44. OK, in for a penny in for a pound. I'm not going to say if this is right or wrong, but I had the need to get all my body work coated with something after having stripped my entire car using paint stripper prior to winter arriving (this year). Firstly, with paint stripper it is important to clean all exposed parts with water once stripped. That done, it was dried with compressed air. Once stripped, all exposed rusted bits were treated with a product called Exit Rust - produced by a company in Malaga WA, sold by S&S Industries in Midvale and costs about $35 for 750ml. Does what it is supposed to do and converts any rust into a black inert substance, the residue being easily cleaned off. Now the right or wrong bit and I'm sure there are any number of opinions which are probably both right and/or wrong. To keep my panels (surface) rust free while I get around to putting a full primer on, I've sprayed them with an etch primer (Concept Paints 103 Etch Primer). I've taken this approach because: 1. I'm doing the stripping myself and therefore that takes time; 2. I can spray panels, etc. as and when I need to; 3. On bare metal, etch primer, I am told and have no reason to doubt, provides an equal or better level of adhesion than epoxy primer; and finally, provided you have the time (which fortunately, I do - yea, I'm one of those ROF's) the cost is next to nothing compared to blasting and epoxy coating. All up it's cost me a lot of hours (which is probably a killer for a lot of people), about $200 for paint stripper, $115 for etch primer and thinners and $35 for rust treatment. Significantly less than the $2k I was quoted to have the body blasted and epoxy coated. Now, I'm not an expert in any of these matters, but I have sought advice from a number of people who work in the industry and got totally confused going through the many (conflicting) bits of information on the 'net, and it seems opinions vary and most agree to disagree. One of the key areas seems to be with drying times. I am once again reliably informed that provided etch primer is given time to dry (like days, not hours) then problems with laying high build primers and base and clear over the top are minimal. Which leads to the next step - filling. Can fill be applied over an etch primer? Well, advice I have been given is "yes" or "no" - your choice. You can sand the primer off in those places where you need to fill, or you can apply fill over the top. Once again, lots of conflicting advice, but at the end of the day seems it's a personal choice. If you apply etch primer, you shouldn't apply an epoxy primer over the top and you shouldn't apply etch primer over the top of any fill repairs you may have done. Advice provided to me is to use a 2k acrylic urethane primer over the etch and any fill repairs and then sand and flat after that. This is based on my choice of wanting to later apply a clear over base finish. I'm keen to hear if my proposed approach is flawed and/or if there are potential problems that I haven't been advised of that people have experienced. Better to find out now than after I've applied the final clear coat. Sorry Ryan, I guess the short answer to your original question is hit it with an etch primer. I'll wait for the tsunami. Cheers Paul
    2 points
  45. Sprocket

    Weak Valve Springs

    G'day. It's been a while since I looked in here, and I found this old thread I started a few years ago and thought an update might be of interest to members. Long story short - I bought new valve springs and fitted them without removing the head. To hold the valves on their seats while removing the springs, I fed a length of soft 1/4" rope down the spark plug hole and turned the crank until the piston jammed the rope against the top of the combustion chamber. However, the new valve springs made absolutely no difference to the engine's performance. The "expert" engine tuner I took it to had made a wrong diagnosis. Now at a loss as to what the problem could be, I figured I'd leave it as a job for another day. That was a couple of years ago. In the meantime, the car was still driveable, just not to its full potential. Short story long - April 2020. It's the middle of the Coronavirus lockdown, so I’m looking for stuff to do. The “job for another day” became the job for today. Time to do a bit more head scratching. The head scratching goes like this: It can only be a couple of things - fuel mixture leaning out (not getting enough fuel) or a breakdown of the spark at high revs. Fuel starvation could be poor pump capacity, but it has a mechanical pump as well as an electrical one. The car belonged to my late brother Bob. Reading through his notes, he was under the impression that the electrical pump was a bit under-rated, so he fitted a mechanical pump as well. With both pumps operating, it seems unlikely to be a starvation issue. Sure enough, with the fuel line disconnected, it seems to gush petrol at a prodigious rate. I also took the carbs apart, cleaned, checked, re-balanced. All good there. Fitted new air filters. None of which made any difference. Cross fuel starvation off the list. So, looking at the ignition system, it has an aftermarket electronic doohickey in the distributor that replaces the original points system. That’s a good thing I guess, and it seems to work because the car runs and the auto advance works (I checked it with a strobe). Plugs are all new so no problem there either. Coil looks new, so I guess someone has added it at some stage. I checked the coil's primary resistance and it reads 3Ω on the meter. That seems about average for a motorcycle (I'm a motorcycle fettler, not a car guy). Typically a motorcycle coil only fires once per revolution (usual bike setup is an ignition trigger on the crank), but what about a 6 cylinder car where it's firing 3 times as often? Checking the workshop manual specs, it says 0.5Ω. Aha, we could be onto something. I need to try a coil with the correct resistance, so I bought a 0.5Ω coil and installed it. The car would start but not run. Hmm ... more head scratching. It would continue to run if I connected a jumper wire from the battery to the coil positive. That got me thinking about the voltage getting to the coil via the ballast resistor. The ballast resistor measured 1.5Ω. That’s abought right for the 3Ω coil because the coil gets about 8V. (Ohm's Law for series resistances - system voltage = 12V, of which 4V is lost through the resistor and 8V through the coil). But putting a 0.5Ω coil in with the same 1.5Ω ballast resistor meant that most of the voltage drop was across the resistor rather than the coil. The coil was getting heaps of current due to the low overall resistance, but the voltage drop now becomes 9V across the resistor and only 3V across the coil, which is nowhere near enough to allow it to make a spark. It would start OK because the coil gets full battery voltage when the starter is cranking. As soon as the key turns back to the run position after starting, the ballast resistor comes into circuit, effectively shutting the coil down. That's when the light bulb moment happened. The car originally had points/condenser setup and the electronic trigger is an aftermarket fitment, so the original coil and resistor spec may now be irrelevant. I rummaged through Bob’s paperwork and found a receipt dated 3/2/2015 from Performance Ignition Services in Nunawading for the supply and installation of a Pertronix ignitor kit. A bit of internet googling on Pertronix ignitors found the installation instructions for that unit. It revealed that the 3Ω coil is in fact correct, but it said the ballast resistor should be removed or bypassed. Pennies are starting to drop. Even with the 3Ω coil, it appears that 8V it was getting via the ballast resistor was insufficient to allow the coil to reach saturation when it was trying to cycle faster than 15,000Hz (3 cycles per revolution @ 5,000 rpm). The ballast resistor could be all that’s standing in the way of full ignition performance. So I bypassed the resistor with a short piece of wire. I took the car for a test drive and it revs right through to the red line. Problem solved … finally! All that farting around changing the bloody valve springs, and all it needed was a little bit of wire to short out the ballast resistor! You’d think a company called Performance Ignition Services would have got an ignition installation right, especially when the correct installation procedure was in the instructions that came with the Pertronix unit. According to their invoice, along with the Pertronix unit and the new coil, they also supplied and fitted the problem ballast resistor (presumably to replace the original lower value resistor?). They also supplied and fitted a new condenser - another item that's not required with an electronic trigger. The take home lesson is never trust self-proclaimed experts. The professional ignition installer got it wrong. Then the engine tuner I took it to mis-diagnosed the problem that was created by the first guy, and led me up the garden path in the direction of valve springs.
    2 points
  46. I would consider the use of Cold Gal for the parts of the car body you are not going to expose to the elements. I would refer to a medical specialist for advice
    2 points
  47. Whereas at some point it had 240Z tail lamps…
    2 points
  48. He's quite a lot older than me, though. So he's probably a lot closer to your age Bobby, then you think.
    2 points
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