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d3c0y

Classic car bubble

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On 11/2/2018 at 10:51 AM, hmd said:

Oh no, are we going to get a bunch of wankers who can't afford a Porsche rushing to buy the z now ?

 

On 11/2/2018 at 11:28 AM, aircobra said:

not sure if you know, but GQ is a men's FASHION magazine

what did you expect?

Oh no, more people might fall in love with the cars we have fallen in love with :P

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If you can't easily plug a Haltech in and dial up tuning fork for a session, maybe it won't be collectible in future?

https://www.hagerty.com/articles-videos/articles/2018/12/04/muscle-cars-arent-gaining-collector-car-market

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https://journal.classiccars.com/2018/12/16/xers-millennials-finally-surpass-boomers-in-collector-car-activity/

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And while American vehicles are most popular with all generations, “millennials, in particular, have a soft spot for Japanese cars,” the Hagerty statistics show.  The company adding that millennials are four times more likely than boomers to seek information about cars produced in Japan.

 

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I guess that’s cause many of the boomers are computer illiterate whereas the millennials google in their sleep.

 

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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/cars/article-6459617/Is-classic-car-market-stalling-Prices-just-1-April.html

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Its cold in here, Newcastle, United Kingdom, 4 weeks ago

A fall in Classic car prices is always a sign for a stock market crash, happened in the 80's, 90's and just before 2008

 

This comment I agree with. The end is nigh!

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It's interesting that 70s cars are kind of done now. I'm looking at selling a 260Z coupe this year and there hasn't really been any movement for the last couple of years on the top end of the market.

It's all about the 90s now.

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I wonder what it sold for brand new? prolly close to the $100k mark

im thinking with inflation, it may not have been a great investment if bought brand new.

 

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2 hours ago, Cozza said:

I wonder what it sold for brand new? prolly close to the $100k mark

im thinking with inflation, it may not have been a great investment if bought brand new.

 

https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/toyota-supra-preview

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History of the Supra – Toyota Supra Mark IV

The last iteration of the Supra, the Toyota Supra Mark IV, was introduced in 1993. The MK IV was shorter, lower, and wider than the MK III, and it offered two engine choices. The base engine was a 3.0-liter inline six-cylinder that produced 220 horsepower, while the upgraded twin-turbocharged engine produced 320 horsepower (making it the most powerful engine in a Toyota-badged vehicle at the time). The more powerful engine was able to get the Supra to 60 mph in less than five seconds.

In 1996, the Supra’s MSRP rose to over $40,000, and the manual transmission was removed, though it would be back again in 1997. However, this would be the beginning of the end for the Supra. Sales started to drop, and production was finally ceased in 1999.

Based on US inflation now.

https://www.usinflationcalculator.com/

It says $40,000 USD to 2018 money is: $64,254.43

Not factoring in holding costs, storage, maintenance, insurance, registration, taxes etc.. still not a bad return. Better than putting the same money in a bank account anyway.

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$40k USD for an auto, 73 240z. Which appears to have an average dashboard restoration, black valve cover, aftermarket wheels etc..

HLS30-124980

https://www.barrett-jackson.com/Events/Event/Details/1973-DATSUN-240Z-224624

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Lot #453 - This 1973 Datsun 240Z is powered by its original, matching-numbers 2.4-liter L24 engine producing 151hp with twin side-draft original carburetors, backed by an automatic transmission. 1973 was the last year of production for the 240Z. This 240Z was the beneficiary of a complete and comprehensive ground-up restoration including engine removal and rebuild from ground up, transmission removal and rebuild and a rear end rebuild. It was completely dismantled and stripped to bare metal, then reassembled and finished in its original colors. The interior was refinished, all chrome was removed and refinished and all rubber interior and exterior trim was removed and replaced. Additionally, this Datsun was upgraded with Konig 16” high-finish period-look aluminum wheels with four brand-new tires, and it has less than 2,000 miles since its completion. It’s equipped with the original wood-rim steering wheel, original AM/FM radio, front disc brakes and a completely stock interior. **TITLE IN TRANSIT**

 

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On 1/7/2019 at 2:26 PM, d3c0y said:

It's interesting that 70s cars are kind of done now. I'm looking at selling a 260Z coupe this year and there hasn't really been any movement for the last couple of years on the top end of the market.

Looks like they just got another shot in the arm..

Even the V8 swapped car did well at Barrett Jackson, the 73 Auto 240z sold for $40k+ The 2+2 got $44k and the V8 swap went for $67k...

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I feel as though Zs are going to keep climbing in value - the surge in 90s JDM prices is due to the US just getting their foot in the door (see Mark IV Supra prices going absolutely mental) and people being able to get their childhood "hero cars". Most of the new market entrants were born around the 90s and grew up with the Japanese sports car boom - something our Zs have lineage from. The reason Euro and US classics are plateauing is because they don't hold the same sentimental value (bar the odd Mustang or Porsche). 

I'd be inclined to believe that the Z is ingrained enough in pop culture and history that it will always hold more value that say an RA Celica. If anything I'd be inclined to say that rising 90s JDM prices will drag up 70s JDM stuff - Hakosuka's already seem pretty tied to more modern GT-Rs in terms of price movement, Zs as well. My generation and the lot afterwards grew up with 90s and early 2000s stuff (Fast and Furious, Need for Speed) being centrepiece - still at least another 5 years before everyone who grew up on it enters the market. Some big changes coming in mainstream car culture right now.

If Nissan pull their finger out and release a solid new Z watch prices go mental like AE86 prices did when the GT86 was released, just has to be priced low enough that a 19 year old can take out a poorly thought out loan to buy one.

Watch late 80s and early 90s JDM cars surge for the next few years before they mellow out. Half destroyed Silvia's are selling for $10k but there are still plenty around being drifted into walls. 

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I tend to agree, I also think Resto mod S30z's may do better than Resto mod cars of the same era. Think Rb26 in a 240z. Simply because of the tuning culture around cars at the moment and that's always been a bucket list mod for some.

Original examples will still do well, but I think modified cars may surprise in terms of value.

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