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Dragonball240z

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Dragonball240z last won the day on July 20

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About Dragonball240z

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  1. Good evening all, I am wanting to buy a driver's side door locking mechanism in good condition. Thanks Julian
  2. I used heavy duty automotive headliner adhesive from Autobarn
  3. The drivers side pillar vinyl was stuck directly into the bodywork. This same process was used to complete the front and the passenger side roof vinyl. I was super stoked with the results... over the next couple of days, my dad wasn't happy with a couple of fine creases and managed to work them out. SO the finish was even better. The last photo probably doesn't do it justice. I will try get a better one in the coming days in better light
  4. For the next step we put a bit of adhesive on the top of the vinyl, then locked it in with a pvc pinchweld. Adhesive was then added body work under the foam (we didn't put any on the foam so we can work any kinks out at a later stage) and the last 20mm of the vinyl. The vinyl was folded over the pinch weld and stuck to the body work. The door seal will also help lock it all in.
  5. We sprayed the adhesive on on the foam and the roof. We made sure not to spray all they way to the edge of the roof (see cardboard in first pic) and the foam. This was very important to achieve the result that we did. If the adhesive went all the way we wouldn't have been able to tuck the vinyl & foam in (see third pic).
  6. We have also tackled the roof and front pillar vinyls using our own patterns and the materials in the pics. I sourced some closed cell foam from clarke rubber, and the vinyl was left over from my dads last project. The contact adhesive we used is made to deal the heat generated off the roof.
  7. Finally getting a chance to post again with some more progress. The original diamond vinyl trim was cleaned up and reinstalled into the car. We also cut and installed some carpet underlay. I need to source some carpet and choose a colour. I'm thinking of going a gety to lighten up the interior.
  8. I purchased the Kia seals from the wreakers. I'm pretty sure you could get them brand new from Kia. The are off a 1998- 2002 Kia Sportage
  9. Hi all, I was wondering if anyone had or could point me in the right direction for the following parts for a 72 240z. Vapor Expansion tank tail light rubber gaskets tail light wiring harness thanks Julian
  10. Whilst looking for parts in his garage, my dad came across his receipt for his 260z that he purchased in 1976. He also had a Datsun price list from the same year.
  11. We have made a bit of progress in the last week. I sourced some Kia rubbers for the doors and hatch. They fit great and were very easy on the wallet. Continued with cleaning and painting the underside. Most of it completed now. Hatch was also installed. She is starting too look like a car now!
  12. Not a problem. Unfortunately I'm not sure of the branded rubber. It was in a box of parts when i purchased the Z.
  13. Good evening, I have put together some written instructions for the installation of rear hatch glass rubber with chrome insert. The whole process took approx 3.5 hours. It will be easiest if this is done on a table so you don't have to bend down whilst working on the hatch. Make sure that the rim of the hatch, the glass and the rubber is clean. Mine had some old masking tape along the rim the whole way around. For the string we used some leftover curtain rope roughly 5mm thick (see example image below). You have to work this inside the inner groove of the rubber (the groove that will fit over the body work) . You can use a fly screen plastic spline tool to assist with getting into the groove without damaging the rubber. Make sure that you have excess rope overlapping roughly 300mm. next step is to fit the rubber around the glass Once the rubber is on the glass you can carefully install the chrome inserts. Try getting the longer sections in first, then move to the smaller pieces. Once within the rubber they should fit pretty snugly. If they seem a bit loose hold in place with some masking tape. Now place the Glass (with rubber and chrome insert) into the hatch. It should work in pretty easily. At this point tape the glass onto the hatch from the outside as you will need to flip the hatch over to work on the inside. It is best to get some help with this (make sure the glass does not fall out, this almost happened to mine) With the hatch now turned over, you should see the excess rope/string hanging out. Now the theory of the string is that as you pull the string out, it will pull the rubber over the rim of the hatch. You have to be quite patient during this step as you don't want the the rope to cut the rubber. In practice you will need some assistance. To assist with this step we used (Ezy Glide Dry Lubricant Aerosol). if you don't have this handy, try looking in your bedside table and use some of your silicone based lube that's sitting in your drawer. If you cant find that look inside your medicine cabinet for some vaseline (would probably be a bit messy and would require more cleanup...but that's nothing new when using such products ) Now spray the rubber and the rim of the hatch with the Ezy Gllide and start slowly pulling out one end of the string. Make sure there is tension in the string when pulling and don't yank it as this will increase the chance of damaging the rubber. When pulling the string, try pulling at a 45 degree angle. We found that this worked best (see image below). Repeat this until all of the string is out. I hope this helps!
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