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datsunrally

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datsunrally last won the day on August 24 2021

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  1. Is loud and obnoxious necessarily "cool"? Drag cars are loud, are they cool? You can spend a six-figure amount on a Porsche Macan, various Audi RS models or even an R8, they're all loud but again, are they cool? While I'm with you on the EV for transport idea, I think for the recreational vehicle the 'right' sound is appropriate. Very occasionally, a Mk1 Lotus Cortina travels down our street. It's not loud, but geez it mights the right, gurgly Weber noises. Always brings a smile. Early air-cooled 911s aren't loud but they make the right mechanical, whirring fan noises and again, bring a smile. This (while being loud, after all, it's a race car) makes ALL the right noises: GT-R at Fuji This kind of gets back to the original vs. restomod question, which as we know, is open to personal taste, but my vote for the right noises to come out of a Zed involve a modded L-series, an efficient exhaust and triple Solexes or Webers up front. Good discussion by the way! Jeff
  2. You could probably ask this question about any old car, restomods proliferate nowadays but the value will likely be determined by how many other people share the "tasteful" intentions of the modifier. Whereas, original is universal, that's how they were and you can't argue with that. IMHO restomods hold no historic value, whereas original (or modified in a period style) is representative of the era of the car. So, no hard and fast rules as far as I can tell, it's all up the market Jeff
  3. This is very tidy but (as a Z non-expert) was there such a thing as a 1979 260Z? 260Z It's equivalent to about $73,000 AUD. Jeff
  4. For the Zed completists, this snipped from the UK evo magazine:
  5. Just read through this and a couple of questions come to mind: What sort of electric pump do you have, what is its PSI output, check it's a carby pump, not a high pressure one for injection Why do you have the mechanical pump connected as well? The electric pump should easily be able to prime the fuel line to the carbs by itself. When you turn the key to 'ON' you should hear it clicking / whirring away, when the pressure builds up sufficiently, you will note the sound changes a little. I would bypass the mechanical pump for now, connect the electric pump to the regulator then turn the ignition to 'ON' and get a reading of the fuel pressure at that point. Then start the car and see what the pressure does. In the ideal world, you would then drive the car around a bit and observe the fluctuations in the pressure under light and heavy throttle applications, then set the pressure at a point that maintains the required pressure range under full load. Do you know how to adjust the Malpassi pressure regulator? They're very easy, if there aren't instructions, then unscrew the little dome nut and you will find a threaded pin with a notch for your screwdriver. From memory (it's been a little while) screwing it down a little will reduce the pressure reading on the gauge. You will need to experiment a bit, you'll get the idea. About 3-3.5 PSI should be good for your Webers. Jumping from poor-running SUs to poor-running Webers was probably a step too far, but it's done now. Did you say in an earlier post that when you took the hose off the tank very little fuel came out? Clearly that's a problem, unless there's no fuel in there, which in itself is a different problem… Jeff
  6. Hi Bobby, I do know somebody with a lathe and making some brass long nuts is certainly on the cards. In the meantime, I have some off-the-shelf JNS 8mm long nuts that will do the job. Thanks for the suggestion BTW. That's a lovely engine bay, job well done! Jeff
  7. Hmm, that's interesting. Maybe there were a couple of different types used by Nissan over the years? The OEM part number searches all ended up NLA so I went for the JNS option you suggested, thanks for that by the way. Do you think the rusty treasures you removed from the manifold are usable / rescuable? Jeff
  8. Thanks for the suggestions, I have started research using a slightly later part number and have made some progress. Jeff
  9. A sensible suggestion but NLA. FWIW the part number is 20602-A7100.
  10. Giving this a little bump, as well as adding a photo. Anyone know where I can find these nuts? Thanks!
  11. Hi all, I'm seeking a bunch of standard exhaust engine pipe nuts (see attached pic), between 4-8 depending on availability. If you've upgraded your Zed to extractors you may have some lying around, if so, please get in touch. Thanks, Jeff
  12. Does anyone have a JDM mesh grille, and if so, could they please measure the internal dimensions of the 'diamond' and either post here or PM? I need to get some mesh for a headlight protector on a different type of Datsun, but am pretty sure it would have been based on the Zed type. Thanks very much! Jeff
  13. +1 for using the OEM bolts where available, also try Nissan if you can get part numbers, sometimes it's surprising what they still have. Be aware though, many are sold in packs of 10 (or even more) and even if you want one bolt, in most instances you'll need to buy the whole pack. Failing that, I've bought JNS and always been very happy with them: https://www.jnsfasteners.com.au/ A thread file and / or thread repair kit is a good investment too, many fasteners can be brought back to life if they have minor thread damage. Jeff
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