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gav240z

Glovebox Inscriptions on S30Z's

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Just for comparison, here's a nice UK market 'HS30-QU' model 240Z marking. ENG for England. The people of Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland were hopefully not offended:

 

HS30-QU.JPG

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3 hours ago, HS30-H said:

That's a first for me. Love it.

I'm wondering if this might have anything to do with radio waveband range needing to be region-specific?

I've got about 10-11 of these radios I collected over the years and I can't recall seeing anything similar on any of the others, but then again most of them look a little worse for wear and weathered.

I believe the 1 on eBay is potentially out of a 73 240z, since it was only used in early North American 240z's, perhaps they had to specify Australia on them in later years to ensure they were fitted to specific markets? As far as I know there is no band differences between AU and North American market radios. Unlike Japanese radios which generally require an expander to work here.

When I get a chance I'll look through my collection of radios to see if I can see any faint scribbles on them (granted most will be from the US, so may not have the same inscriptions).

*Edit the ad says the radio came out of a 71 240z. So that puts that idea to bed. But I recall removing the radio in my 71 and not seeing anything similar. But the yellow cad plating was very much a dull green colour by now and the radio was covered in dust. So I may not have noticed.

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On 5/9/2020 at 12:53 AM, 24 Dat said:

Here's the inscription from HS30-00888

20200509_082136.jpg

"Austo No.1". 

'Austo' pretty much self-explanatory as an abbreviated form of 'Australia', but 'No.1' could signify many things. No.1 of a batch of Australian market cars going down the production line perhaps? Who knows.

Nice one! 

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6 minutes ago, gav240z said:

Thanks Alan, I wonder if #1 means special order?

Hard to say, isn't it? Without wishing to sound like a politician, I'm reluctant to come to a view at this point, LOL.

From my experience (and its only anecdotal...) the dash structure column-support scribblings often seem to have their significance limited to production line 'banter' or cautions related to the dash content itself, whereas the glovebox base notations (I won't call them 'scribblings' because they were clearly written to be seen...) specifically relate to model/market/variant and content. Quite different.

Of course, we - as mere civilians - were never supposed to know. This is factory stuff for factory people, possibly stretching into logistics/destination-specific shipping. There would have been paperwork pertaining to individual cars as well as batches of cars for particular markets/destinations, and grease pen marks on windscreens would have probably been used for road transport loading/dock parking/shipping etc, but the thing that strikes me about the glovebox inscriptions is that they are almost secret, in a kind of protected spot (if that makes sense) which is not likely to get defaced/altered/peeled off/washed off. Semi-permanent. I get the feeling there was a good reason for that.

Of course, the right person from Nissan or Nissan Shatai could tell us straight away I'm sure. Has the be The Right Person though. I've asked both Yoshihiko Matsuo and Hiitoshi Uemura specifically about them, and they were both oblivious to their presence on the cars ("Wow. Never knew that!"). Not their department...

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I guess in this particular case it's from #888 and it's possible it's the car Len Brennan bought all those years ago.. given it was a white 904 / blue car and has similar wheels to those pictured when Len had a similar car in the 70s.

I guess I don't want to twist the narrative to make it fit, but it is interesting that it may have indicated a special order or request.

More about what I'm talking about here.

I guess the more we see of these markings the more we will learn.

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Thanks Alan and Gav, for your comments i will get some photos of #183 and #521 on the weekend of there inscriptions and add them.

Gav pity your White and Blue car doesn't have No1 written on it it, would be interesting to see what the other White and Blue combo cars have inscribed 

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I pulled the gearbox out of my race car this morning #521 and the glovebox area has been removed to house the fuses etc so no inscriptions, #183 was completely  rebuilt in 1990 and no inscription on that car either, i checked my 72 240Z HS30-11509 and it had this inscription (photos attached) , i checked my 1976 260Z and my friends 2+2 and nothing on either of them. Maybe @HS30-H can make something of it 

   

glovebox.jpg

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5 hours ago, 24 Dat said:

I pulled the gearbox out of my race car this morning #521 and the glovebox area has been removed to house the fuses etc so no inscriptions, #183 was completely  rebuilt in 1990 and no inscription on that car either, i checked my 72 240Z HS30-11509 and it had this inscription (photos attached) , i checked my 1976 260Z and my friends 2+2 and nothing on either of them. Maybe @HS30-H can make something of it 

   

glovebox.jpg

I'd say that looks to be 'PNG' and then another 'P' on the far right.

First destination Papua New Guinea?

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Can't have been many S30z's destined for PNG.. we know HS30 00012 was a PNG car. Maybe this car has its glovebox after it was turned into a race car?

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1 hour ago, gav240z said:

Can't have been many S30z's destined for PNG..

Apparently Nissan's distributor in New Guinea was called 'Boroko Motors Ltd', based in Port Moresby. 'Boroko' is a great pun in Japanese.

By 1970 Nissan had distributors, concessionaires and dealerships all over the world. Their regular ten year report books (huge tomes with high production values) list them all, and I can see they had distributors ranging south from Okinawa and on to Saipan, Guam, Yap, Truk, Koror, Timor and down to Port Moresby before hitting Australia and then stretching out to NZ.

Of course, this was the second time the Japanese had paid a 'visit' to Port Moresby via a similar route, and with the intentions of getting a foothold in Aus and NZ. First time didn't quite work out as planned... :)

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Posted (edited)
Quote

First time didn't quite work out as planned... :)

No it didn't, praise the lord (and pass the ammunition). But only due to the sheer guts, determination and heroism of the Aussies sent 'up the track' to stop them. I've just finished re-reading 'Kokoda' by Peter Fitzsimons... a great read.

Sorry, getting off topic...

Edited by gilltech

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I do wonder how many arrived in Port Moresby and how many are left, given the nature of the place it's hard to imagine cars of that "status" surviving for long.. 

But a quick Google search and I found what appears to be an early 240z in PNG area. (Rabaul and Malaguna Rd in particular it would appear).

http://athomeatriverbend.blogspot.com/2016/05/its-almost-half-century-ago.html

Interesting to note is the early style fender mirrors that were also seen on HS30 00004, early D caps, but no vents in the hatch! Interesting. I wonder if the car is still around today?

logan3.png

logan5.png

logan7.png

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, HS30-H said:

I'd say that looks to be 'PNG' and then another 'P' on the far right.

First destination Papua New Guinea?

Yes i agree Alan as i know the previous owner had quite a bit to do with PNG and his mechanic's brother had a Z brought in from PNG which was turned into a race car so the glove box could even be from that car. i guess i better check the oz compliance plate 

 

Edited by 24 Dat
additional

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8 hours ago, gilltech said:

No it didn't, praise the lord (and pass the ammunition). But only due to the sheer guts, determination and heroism of the Aussies sent 'up the track' to stop them. I've just finished re-reading 'Kokoda' by Peter Fitzsimons... a great read.

Sorry, getting off topic...

Yeah. My tongue was rather firmly planted in my cheek and I'm glad if the point was taken well. 

When I was looking at Nissan's map - to remind myself where PNG actually *is* just as much as anything else - I was once again struck by how big Imperial Japan's empire could have been if they had not been pushed back so gallantly from the south.

My uncle was in the Chindits in Burma, fighting the IJA, taken prisoner and ending up in Changi but at least surviving. He hated Japan, the Japanese and Japanese products for the rest of his life. We fell out over it. In contrast, my other half's father was an officer surgeon in the Imperial Japanese Navy, sailing around the Pacific on various hospital ships picking up casualties - including Allied combatants - and treating them on board until they could be evacuated to land based hospitals. Luckily he didn't hate the English bloke his daughter brought home (or if he did, he didn't show it) and it was fascinating to listen to him talk about his wartime experiences on the few occasions that he *did* feel like talking about it. He was the only survivor of his class at military college, all his colleagues killed at war. He apparently felt deep guilt in surviving. Heavy stuff.

Sorry for the digression... 

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Your 'digression' is fascinating stuff, what a contrast you've been faced with.

My father, as a vet, was kept home and restricted to horse-mounted Home Guard service during the WW2 years but hated the Japanese due to the enduring stresses and privations of the war years when everyone in NZ and Australia expected Japanese invasion forces to come sailing over the horizon at any moment. And all too many of NZ's and Australia's fighting forces were occupied defending what were regarded as primarily British interests in the European and Middle Eastern theatres of war. It had quickly become common knowledge of the manner in which the inhabitants of occupied countries and captured combatants were being treated by the Japanese. He lost several friends due to the Pacific conflict, and always resented that the authorities hadn't allowed him 'to do his bit', by that meaning service overseas. He owned numerous Ford and Holden cars for decades refusing to buy anything Japanese made, although very late in life he did finally relent and owned just one which being more compact better suited his needs. I can recall him being mortified, many decades ago, when I'd pointed out to him one day that his National transistor radio, with which he listened to the cricket, despite the 'English' sounding name was actually made in Japan! Oops.

One of my grandfathers as a front line medic survived both Gallipoli and the Western Front in WW1 and went off to war again in 1940, sadly succumbing to typhus fever of all things in the Middle East in 1943. Like your father-in-law, he was a medical officer, going off to war with bandages not bullets. We know from his letters home that he treated the wounded from both sides of the conflicts, with apparently no hard feelings towards the enemy despite some of the horrific scenes he must have encountered. He must have been an exemplary character. His loss to his wife and family was profound, it affected them all for the rest of their lives, my late mother never got over losing her dad while she was still a teenager and it haunted her in her final years while succumbing to dementia. As you say, heavy stuff.

Again, apologies for being off topic.

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On 5/18/2020 at 12:32 PM, 24 Dat said:

Yes i agree Alan as i know the previous owner had quite a bit to do with PNG and his mechanic's brother had a Z brought in from PNG which was turned into a race car so the glove box could even be from that car. i guess i better check the oz compliance plate 

 

@HS30-H and @gav240zJust checked the car and no compliance plate or even holes for the pop rivets or screws so looking more like a PNG car 

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My 72 (#10552) has no compliance plate, not sure if it was ever fitted either? But my 70 (#150) / 71 (#1415) have it. Not sure about #51. I don't think it does.. would be good to know compliance date to give rough build date estimate.

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