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Braided brake lines and their effectiveness?

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I'm in the process of putting some new rotors on the front. I understand that brake lines can expand under braking pressure and take way some of the efficiency of the brakes.

How much would I notice braided lines on a street car if the brake fluid and in turn the lines aren't getting super hot? Do they still expand to any significant amount when relativley cool?

What can I expect to pay for a braided lines to suit the front and are they readily available?

I've read on some sites selling them OS and stressing that they sell street legal braided lines; whats the go with that comment, are some not street legal?

 

Thanks

Sulio

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id be looking at prices from enzed, and forget the other brand, that supports the v8 supercar team, will get back with the price.... they are in altona....

 

but a friend got his 180sx front end done, costed $190 with all fittings, lines etc etc, his indicated was that he can feel marginal differance with his brakes, but its more about the feel of the brakes than the effectiveness he said, but you know he drives a 180 so what does he know

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I can't recall exactly but braided lines aren't that expensive....

when i started in my brakes...did it the cheats way and took the old grotty rubber lines down to Better brakes and asked them to make braided lines of the same length as them.....

furthermore, if you need any advice on the lines (or stuff brake related), Better Brakes have always been helpful.

 

Huw

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I'm in the process of putting some new rotors on the front. I understand that brake lines can expand under braking pressure and take way some of the efficiency of the brakes.

How much would I notice braided lines on a street car if the brake fluid and in turn the lines aren't getting super hot? Do they still expand to any significant amount when relativley cool?

What can I expect to pay for a braided lines to suit the front and are they readily available?

I've read on some sites selling them OS and stressing that they sell street legal braided lines; whats the go with that comment' date=' are some not street legal?[/quote']

 

You will notice very little difference on the street (assuming the original lines are in reasonable nick), but on the track where brakes are pushed to the limit (well, in theory) is where they start to make a difference.

 

To be legal, they must be ADR compliant and will be tagged to show that. It's only in the last few years that these have become available and I believe places like Earl's and a few others have the capability and authorisation. It's highly unlikely that lines bought OS would be compliant. That said, would they safely do they job....probably....and are you likely to be caught....small chance.

 

I actually run 'build your own' braided lines on my Z, which can be bought from specialist motorsport suppliers. The line itself is sold by the meter along with a wide range of compression fittings and adaptors......but I wouldn't recommend this for a road-going car.

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with regard to compliance.....

when i bought my lines from better brakes they made a point of pointing out the markings & compliance numbers on the lines that they had made....so i assume they are legal if you go that way.

 

cheers

Huw

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Thanks guys,

 

I expected them to be about $80.00 per side so was'nt far off. Will have to drop in to both Better Brakes and Enzed during the week at some point.

 

Thanks

Sulio

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