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260DET

Brake Line Flaring Tool Z31

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I hope so - I bought the same tool (without the tube cutter) from eBay for $42 last week;

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/3-16-Brake-Line-Compact-SAE-Double-Flare-Flaring-Tool-suit-Bundy-Tube-SALE/252975302909?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

 

I chose it on the basis that it seems to be the same as the 'Draper 23312 Expert 3/16" SAE Hand-Held Brake Pipe Flaring Tool' except that the clamping bolts are shorter.

I think its also the same as the 'Eastwood On Car Flaring Tool for 3/16 Tubing p/n 31244' and the 'Powerhand Brake Line Flare Tool'.

 

The Draper tool was tested in the February 2013 edition of the UK magazine "Classics Monthly".

It scored 9/10 and won the 'Test WInner' and 'Pro Choice' awards in the test.

 

I have not used it yet, but it is certainly a high quality tool. The branded versions usually sell for a lot more.

 

Some user reviews here;

http://car-tools.headphoneszone.net/tag/draper-expert-23312-sae-hand-held-brake-pipe-flaring-tool-316-inch-review/

 

post-101663-0-05310200-1512188740_thumb.jpg

Edited by GongZ

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I just noticed that the tool has been improved over the one tested in 2013.

 

Step 2 in the Classics Monthly Review is no longer applicable.

 

post-101663-0-41591600-1512198251_thumb.jpg

 

The tool has a hole through it to act as a window and the stop block can be screwed all the way in. The pipe is then inserted and will align with the line on the tool as shown in my photo below;

 

post-101663-0-75972500-1512198289_thumb.jpg

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That's good news GongZ, thanks. Somewhere in the back of my messy mind was something about Japanese flares being different to American ones. But that's it.

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Google tells me that it's the euro ones which are different, US and Jap ones are the same. Seeing that the tool is marked 'SAE' it should be good for our cars.

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Yes Richard, and the correct brake line nuts are known as "10mm x 1.0 Fine thread, male, fully threaded, steel nut - SAE flare"

 

post-101663-0-21379300-1512275431_thumb.jpg

 

"10mm x 1.0 Fine thread, male, fully threaded, steel nut, 16mm long overall.

This is the standard Asian style nut used with 3/16"/4.75mm (CNF-3) SAE flared tubing"

 

Info taken from;

http://store.fedhillusa.com/metricthreadpitch.aspx

 

 

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I just thought I would add to this.

 

The container of "Special Punch Grease - do not eat"  :o that came with the flaring tool is very small.

I tried searching for the grease to see if it can be purchased separately, without success.

 

I then found this article;

http://www.redrubbergrease.com/tip-how-to-better-way-make-brake-line-double-flare-red-rubber-grease.html

- which says "Red rubber grease is not the best metal to metal lubricant, but because it is compatible with brake

fluids and will not contaminate brake lines it works great in this particular application."

 

Red rubber grease is readily available.

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Are the lines on a 240z the same dimensions? If so I need one of these too...

 

Yes, the 240Z brake lines (and the clutch hard line) are 3/16" (4.75mm) outside diameter.

The fuel supply line is 5/16" (8mm) outside diameter.

 

I would imagine that the brake lines are the same size on 260Z's and 280ZX's as well - it seems to be a very common size across all car makes.

Edited by GongZ

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I just thought I would add to this.

 

The container of "Special Punch Grease - do not eat"  :o that came with the flaring tool is very small.

I tried searching for the grease to see if it can be purchased separately, without success.

 

I then found this article;

http://www.redrubbergrease.com/tip-how-to-better-way-make-brake-line-double-flare-red-rubber-grease.html

- which says "Red rubber grease is not the best metal to metal lubricant, but because it is compatible with brake

fluids and will not contaminate brake lines it works great in this particular application."

 

Red rubber grease is readily available.

I used a similar tool to do the lines on my 911, but it was old and I got some looking good, but others didn't come out as nice as I like. For lubricant though, I found just dipping the line in a little cap of brake fluid worked well. 

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