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Does everyone carry a spare wheel in their car?

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Might sound like a silly question but I know of a few people who don't carry spare wheels including myself. Many years ago I filled in my wheel well and put in a centrally located 95 litre alloy fuel tank.

Instead of carrying a spare tyre I have always kept one of those spray cans in the car to plug the whole and get me to safety. Or rely on the wife to come to the rescue. Anyway the point of this issue was to inform people of alternatives which I have heard about. Some new cars don't have spares anymore like the Audi TT which has a puncture repair kit. It has a similar spray can and a small pump to get you going again. A work college was telling me how he fixed his puncture in the Audi a week ago. Got me to thinking I would prefer something like that in my car. Bit more relibale. Searched the old eBay and found another alternative. A puncture repair kit which I reckon I will get. Cheap and should do the job in the even of a puncture to get me to safety.

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Tyre-Puncture-Repair-Kit-Car-Sedan-Holden-Ford-Valiant_W0QQitemZ120245628130QQihZ002QQcategoryZ6763QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Anyway whilst nothing beats a spare these are some alternatives if you are like me or want to save 25kg on a spare and jack in the car. Obviously not recomended for an every day driver but a weekender. Hmmm worth considering.

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They are great,however, you wont fix a blow out with one and with cars commonly driven fast, a blow out is definately a possibility.  I dont think my spare would even fit over my callipers anymore, so might have to look into that.

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Actually that is a good point Scott. I forgot about the spare clearing the callipers. I know mine won't fit on my front because of that. So another reason to carry the kit. I think it's pretty rare for a tyre to blow out these days. I hear you, but in 98% of cases I reckon a flat would relate to a nail, screw or another small object. As mentioned I am not saying it is the perfect solution but better than having nothing to get you home.

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Yeh for sure.  I reckon ill do it too, just make sure I have my rego on my NRMA roadside assistance.

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They do work, as I had to use one recently, but there are problems getting the tyre fixed properly afterwards. In fact, if you read the can, it says on it to inform the tyre repairer that it has been used. I think it sets like concrete and makes their job that much harder to get off and repair. You are also only supposed to travel at a max. of 60 km/h. Do I carry a spare ? Yes. The reason I had to use it was because the spare was flat and no where near a gas station, but what happens if the tyre is cut (as opposed to a blowout, but the same result) ? No can is going to repair that. I think a space saver spare is a minimum.

 

Roadside assistance is fine if you have 1 - 2 hours to kill, but it always happens when you are in a hurry !

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pressure can might work, puncture repair kit might but what if it dont , what if a rim is damaged and the tyre is ok but flat come off the bead, bit of an uneasy feeling driving without a spare, could be quite embarassing stuck out in the middle of nowhere without a spare, dont you have room in the back to mount a spare i know it might sacrifise space 2+2 have more room than 2 seaters dont they? with low profile tyres they ussally become damaged in the sidewalll due to under inflation overheated then they shred inside,, a low profile tyre can look inflated but can actually be dead flat , oh sorry in answer to your question , absolutely

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the gas can dosnt set like concrete, the tyre fitter is to be informed of the sealant being used becauase the tyre is filled with a flammable gas from the aerosole pak, a typical method of repairing a tubeless tyre is to drill the hole and fit a plug, a special tapered drill bit is used on a high speed die grinder , when the drill hits the wire plys it creates a spark an kaboom its all over , the sealing sollution stays soft goes harder when exposed to air clogging the hole,,,

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I hear what you say Daniel. I am waiting for the embarrassing day of being stuck on the side of the road with a flat but it hasn't happenned yet. I am OK to take the risk and wear the consiquences if it happens. But I will get this puncture repair kit which should get me going in 95% of cases. I reckon it would be better than the old spary can. I figure it's better than nothing and if it doesnt work then go to the last resort of calling RACV for a tray truck. Like I say I hardly drive the car so the chances are slim. 4 Tassie trips at 1,300 klms with no spare so fingers crossed my luck continues but at least I have half a chance of fixing the problem with these devices should the unfortunate happen.   :)

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no spare wheel at all no jack and no wheel brace LOL. And its a daily driver. if blow out get my missus or mates to bring the things and off i go. though never happend yet. thank god for the technology and mobile fones  8)

 

did blow a gearbox in the industrial area one sunday morning 2AM while practicing 0-100kmh times. called few friends. 10min wasnt alone anymore in the middle of nowhere. 30min after fone call a  car and a trailer was on the location. who needs RAA RACQ OR NRMA

basicaly have a close group of friends on 24hr standby. but be prepared to return the favour.

 

i do have a space saver which will eventualy find its way in the car. but having no jack and tools what the point carrying the wheel  ;D save weight and fuel (at $1.67 PL sounds better and better)

 

 

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certainly some sage advice there Craig

I ditched my spare years ago in both my Roadster and the road going Zed and I figure that I have only ever had one flat in the 20 years I have owned my Zed so the chances are pretty slim. I do however retain the jack as the tire inflation cans only work well enough to inflate the tyre when jacked up........I found this out the hard way  :-\

BTW

 

My new MX5 has no spare.........it comes with 5 years road side assistance and an emergency air inflation kit..........(goo in a can). My previous 2001 model MX5 had a space saver but the standard 17" wheels fitted would not fit in the bloody boot anyway.....so the boffins at Mazda found logic and ditched the spare all together in the latest model.....and saved weight.

Some of the Audis and BMWs are fitted with run flats which whilst practical have dreadful handling qualities due to the very stiff side walls.

 

IMHO

 

Ditch the spare and stick a can of puncture goo in the car......and leave the jack in.

 

Alan

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I think there are a number of different people ditch their spares.

1) Don't fit over some upgraded break systems

2) Filled wheels well. No room in boot/hatch

3) Bigger diameter wheel doesn't fit in the well.

4) Saves weight etc etc

In regards to the spray can use I would rather take an electronic tyre pump instead of a jack. I figure I will need the pump for the repair kit anyway. So I throw it in on long drives since I will carry both. Short trips I'm not overly bothered about.

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