Jump to content
gav240z

Ross Dunkerton and Datsun in Australia

Recommended Posts

The "Red Zed" referred to earlier in this thread is owned by 24 Dat. The car was originally built by Alan Stean who, as discussed elsewhere, is well connected with Ross Dunkerton from rally Zeds in WA in the day and later navigating for Ross in various events.  Alan built the Red Zed for a customers a road going car, then had the opportunity to buy it latter and fitted it with good parts from his stores.  24 Dat confirmed the advice the front struts came from a Dunkerton car, sporting a Halda drive take-off point, but doesn't know if they were from a "Factory Works" car, a "Nissan Australia works" car or a Dunkerton, the Privateer, car.  Alan was also an authorised Nissan Parts Dealer and had access to other good bits.  The "works Pedal box" referenced, is limited to a works brake pedal.  It has a cross-hatched metal foot pad and skirt welded onto the right hand underside to prevent your foot slipping under the brake pedal when moving from the accelerator in  a hurry!  We have one in our stockpile, complete with nissan spare parts sticker.  A gift from Alan Stean.

 

I'd be very pleased to see a photo (if you'd oblige) of that spare works-type brake pedal from your stockpile, and especially would like to see the Nissan spare parts sticker on it. Love stuff like that.

 

The works pedals were hand fabricated using 'stock' parts. You'd start off with a stock pedal - probably complete with original Nissan part label - then chop off the original pedal pad and add the works style (metal, cross-hatched pad with side guard to stop your foot getting stuck underneath it) to the original stem and pivot. So it would not be all that surprising to see an original parts label for a stock part on a works modified spare part... 

 

 

The wider point about 'ex-Works' parts washing around in period and long after is that they can lead us back on trails to original cars and the events they took part in. In that sense they can be useful clues to what cars were around, what they took part in, who crewed them, who had 'ownership' of them and - indeed - the individual identities of the actual cars. In the general scheme of things there were not many proper works Zs knocking around at any one time, unlike the situation with the slightly later 4-cyl cars (of which there appeared to be two or three times as many), so left-over parts and (we wish!) whole cars are comparatively thin on the ground.

 

Genuine works rally Z parts - in my experience - often leave a trail back to their origins, and following those trails can be interesting. I've got quite a few such parts myself, and - by following their trail of ownership and other clues - they can often be linked to individual cars. So when people talk of ex-Works parts (or parts that appear to be ex-Works, or similar) it piques my interest and I always want to look deeper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The various bolt on goodies were quite commonly available, ( chucked out the back of Nissan Aust rally servce trucks, or given away at end of each year)

Howard Marsden was very helpfull to the up and comers!

Even gave away a complete Factory built car!

 

I'd be interested to hear exactly what useful works parts got chucked out the back of service trucks? And are we blurring the lines between Nissan's official (Oppama-based) works rally team and their Japanese personnel/equipment with Nissan Australia's own in-house efforts? Of course they often worked together, but I can't imagine a situation where any Japanese mechanics servicing works Zs would be letting stuff go. Half the time they didn't have enough to start with... 

 

What "complete Factory built car" got given away? I don't know about anyone else here, but I'm talking strictly about S30-series Zs, and not 4cyl cars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For reference, a (bad, sorry!) photo of a set of proper Works pedals on an RHD car from 1971:

 

JZSCXP.jpg

 

There were several different variations across the batches of cars as the style developed, and the drivers gave their input.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it's confusing (we are all confused about at least one aspect of all this...!) but what are you referring to? All the photos appear to show the same car, and not the one(s) wearing the works carnet 'plate '4080'. Different car.

Sorry, I came in late on this discussion, but I got the impression it was being implied the 4080 car was campaigned in the '75 & '76 ARC championships. But it would appear neither Dunkerton or any of the other Zed front runners were using the 4080 car which gives credence to the car being returned to Japan.

I'll get some photos of the works pedal we have and pose them. Looks identical to the one pictured here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

24dat's red zed isnt a works car, if it was, we wouldn't hear the end of it!

It was used by Ross/Alan, or intended to be, in late 1980"s,

Alan should he able to confirm, after he gets back from hs Japan trip, with family!

It was setup as a rally car, much much later!

The various bolt on goodies were quite commonly available, ( chucked out the back of Nissan Aust rally servce trucks, or given away at end of each year)

Howard Marsden was very helpfull to the up and comers!

Even gave away a complete Factory built car!

Jason, i think we are talking cross purposes here. The red zed referred to is not the car Dunkerton and Stean campaigned together in various Tarmac rallies here and in NZ and Ross drove in the Race to the Sky; but the 240z David R now owns. Alan added bits to it when it was in his stable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I came in late on this discussion, but I got the impression it was being implied the 4080 car was campaigned in the '75 & '76 ARC championships. But it would appear neither Dunkerton or any of the other Zed front runners were using the 4080 car which gives credence to the car being returned to Japan.

 

 

Actually, period photos do indeed appear to show Dunkerton using an LHD rally car wearing the 'TKS 33 SU 4080' works carnet license plate in both '75 and '76...

 

Edit: For Example:

 

BuulaJ.jpg

 

...which by all accounts seems to be from the 1976 Lutwyche Village Warana Rally in Queensland.

Edited by HS30-H

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, period photos do indeed appear to show Dunkerton using an LHD rally car wearing the 'TKS 33 SU 4080' works carnet license plate in both '75 and '76...

 

Edit: For Example:

 

BuulaJ.jpg

 

...which by all accounts seems to be from the 1976 Lutwyche Village Warana Rally in Queensland.

Ok, the plot thickens, the middle photo of my previous post from the 76 season ( Dunko sideways with arse in a ditch) was posted with the wrightup for the Warana Rally of that year which Dunkerton won in "260Z". Same car as other photos from 76 season. Note the door number sponsor, but no Carnet No. Plate. The door decals are consistent with photos of other competitors of that year. I think the photo you posted is from another year. Earlier maybe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the photo you posted is from another year. Earlier maybe?

 

Thanks. I've noted - and urged caution on! - the inaccuracies of dates,events and competitors on many of the autopics.com.au photos on other threads, so it would be nice if we could pin down the date of the photo I posted above and the others.

 

This kind of thing does my head in. Bad data in magazines, books and now websites wastes so many people's time...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, the plot thickens, the middle photo of my previous post from the 76 season ( Dunko sideways with arse in a ditch) was posted with the wrightup for the Warana Rally of that year which Dunkerton won in "260Z". Same car as other photos from 76 season. Note the door number sponsor, but no Carnet No. Plate. The door decals are consistent with photos of other competitors of that year. I think the photo you posted is from another year. Earlier maybe?

 

Looking into it further, it seems that the Warana Rally (Queensland) had several different main sponsors in the years that are most relevant here in the Dunkerton/'4080' question. The main sponsor name would have formed the surround to the door number stickers.

 

1972: 'Ace Driving School'.

1973 & 1974: 'Brookside Shopping Center'.

1975 through 1982: 'Lutwyche Shopping Village'.

 

...so the autopics.com.au photos of an LHD car wearing the '4080' carnet plate on its bonnet and with Dunkerton's name on the wing/guard can only be 1975 or 1976. Car has door/start number of '1' with the Lutwyche logo, but I note a photo of Dunkerton (different car) in 1974 Warana with the Brookside Shopping Center door number logo and door/start number '1' too. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

24dat's red zed isnt a works car, if it was, we wouldn't hear the end of it!

There's  probably at least one narcissist or something like it on this forum, and it sure the hell isn't me,

Edited by 24 Dat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The "Red Zed" referred to earlier in this thread is owned by 24 Dat. The car was originally built by Alan Stean who, as discussed elsewhere, is well connected with Ross Dunkerton from rally Zeds in WA in the day and later navigating for Ross in various events.  Alan built the Red Zed for a customers a road going car, then had the opportunity to buy it latter and fitted it with good parts from his stores.  24 Dat confirmed the advice the front struts came from a Dunkerton car, sporting a Halda drive take-off point, but doesn't know if they were from a "Factory Works" car, a "Nissan Australia works" car or a Dunkerton, the Privateer, car.  Alan was also an authorised Nissan Parts Dealer and had access to other good bits.  The "works Pedal box" referenced, is limited to a works brake pedal.  It has a cross-hatched metal foot pad and skirt welded onto the right hand underside to prevent your foot slipping under the brake pedal when moving from the accelerator in  a hurry!  We have one in our stockpile, complete with nissan spare parts sticker.  A gift from Alan Stean.

I will be happy to post photos of the struts next time I take the wheels off  and of the pedal box. also this car in HS30 000183 it is on the early girl thread

Edited by 24 Dat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I certainly hope that wasn't the works shell 240z (original TKS SA 33 4080 car).

 

Unfortunately it looks like Merrick Triplett has since left us. So we cannot ask him about the car.

http://www.westannouncements.com.au/obituaries/thewest-au/obituary-preview.aspx?n=merrick-triplett&pid=170696946&referrer=3057

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems unlikely to me that the Triplett speedway car would be the original '4080'. For one thing the timing doesn't really fit, but neither do the circumstances. The Triplett car appears to be (correct me if I'm wrong) RHD and '4080' was LHD, and there seems to be nothing visual that would suggest the Triplett car being built on an ex-works 'shell.

 

The only connection seems to be that the Triplett car was reported as having been previously owned by Dunkerton (with someone else in between) so it's all a bit thin, but with Dunkerton still using what appears to be an LHD car wearing the '4080' carnet plates at least in 1975 events it all seems academic. 

 

Interesting though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For reference, you can just see the top of a 'works' pedal in this photo.

 

*Edit just noticed Alan already provided a reference photo on the previous page.

2q83jhd.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be very pleased to see a photo (if you'd oblige) of that spare works-type brake pedal from your stockpile, and especially would like to see the Nissan spare parts sticker on it. Love stuff like that.

 

The works pedals were hand fabricated using 'stock' parts. You'd start off with a stock pedal - probably complete with original Nissan part label - then chop off the original pedal pad and add the works style (metal, cross-hatched pad with side guard to stop your foot getting stuck underneath it) to the original stem and pivot. So it would not be all that surprising to see an original parts label for a stock part on a works modified spare part... 

 

 

 

Sorry, took a bit of time to get over to Robin's place to dig out the brake pedal.. The memory plays tricks.  I thought it had a parts sticker on it.  Don't know if the numbers are factory or not but pictures tell a thousand words and the pedal is not dissimilar to the one depicted in your foot-well photo Alan.

post-103246-0-13823900-1462862125_thumb.jpg

post-103246-0-44971300-1462862162_thumb.jpg

post-103246-0-52060800-1462862196_thumb.jpg

post-103246-0-52215800-1462862225_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, took a bit of time to get over to Robin's place to dig out the brake pedal.. The memory plays tricks.  I thought it had a parts sticker on it.  Don't know if the numbers are factory or not but pictures tell a thousand words and the pedal is not dissimilar to the one depicted in your foot-well photo Alan.

 

Great! Thanks for taking the time to do that.

 

That's exactly the hand fabricated type of thing I've seen on Nissan works race and rally cars of the period, with the guard around the side of the pedal pad (to help stop the foot getting stuck underneath) and the pad section hand grooved and dot-punched. Love it. I've replicated the style on my 432-R replica project car.

 

The hand-painted/marked part number matches the style that of many Works spare parts that I've seen. Here's a works clutch pressure plate for comparison:

 

4zogg8.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These parts are quite interesting. Is it just the brake pedal that differs or does the clutch and accelerator pedal have similar changes?

 

The clutch pedals usually had the same type of fabricated steel pad welded to them, but without the 'guard' around the r/h side.

 

Accelerator pedals differed, both through time and preference. The earliest cars had a stock looking accel pedal, but the next batch had fabricated sheet steel pad sections, drilled and dimpled. They often had curved and/or angled sections on their left sides (you might be able to see in the upper pic below), clearly to aid heel-and-toeing. I've seen them cut down in the field too, as in the LHD setup in the lower pic below (in a car which has 'had a life', to put it mildly...).

 

uiL1wq.jpg

 

 

MLCJI7.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, took a bit of time to get over to Robin's place to dig out the brake pedal.. The memory plays tricks.  I thought it had a parts sticker on it.  Don't know if the numbers are factory or not but pictures tell a thousand words and the pedal is not dissimilar to the one depicted in your foot-well photo Alan.

 

By the way, part number 46520-A7610 would indicate an RHD brake pedal with a 4.14 ratio for a Group 2 A10 rally car, available as part of the 'kit list' of rally parts for that model.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, part number 46520-A7610 would indicate an RHD brake pedal with a 4.14 ratio for a Group 2 A10 rally car, available as part of the 'kit list' of rally parts for that model.

Thanks Alan, that's really interesting. Like you, we fabricated our own replica "works" brake pedal (with the side skirt) for our Tarmac rally car before this one came into our possession. I'm guessing the pedal ratio (4.14) is the same as a standard pedal? Never compared it side by side with a standard unit. There is quite a bit of engineering in the works fabricated pad. Quite intricate if it was hand made. Can you explain the Grp 2 A10 thing please?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you explain the Grp 2 A10 thing please?

 

A10 series Datsun 160J/Datsun510/Datsun Stanza/Datsun Violet (name dependent on market) 4 cylinder saloons modified to FIA appendix J regulations, in classes Group 1, Group 2, Group 2-A, Group 2-B and Group 4.

 

Probably easier to illustrate with a couple or three photos:

 

gRw0YR.jpg

PfnCWL.jpg

kBPFot.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×