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  1. Today
  2. Looks like 40mm carbs. Starting bid $650. https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/392319760208?ul_noapp=true
  3. HS30-H

    Ross Dunkerton and Datsun in Australia

    Jeff, Your post is a very good example of why I try to be scrupulous in restricting my assertions to relate ONLY to the Works 240Z & 260Z rally cars. I've been studying them for many years and I think I have a pretty good handle on them by now. I know a few examples of what we might call 'skullduggery' in period, but any number-swapping wasn't actually Nissan's direct doing. All bets are off for me when it comes to the PA10s and later stuff. My impression - looking in from the outside - is that it all starts to get a bit more laissez faire when the locally-built cars started coming into the mix and Nissan were providing parts and comprehensive data on how to build G2 and G4 cars. There were also far more Works cars going into the mix (by contrast, the Works 240Zs and 260Zs were far, far fewer in number and spread out evenly over a good five years). So I don't bring what I call 'later' activities into the mix when I'm researching the Zs. As far as I'm concerned, post '76, Here Be Dragons. When the likes of Ford and BMC were swapping identities on cars it was usually done for reasons of convenience. 'Log Book', identity papers, insurance, road tax, MOT test certificate and any scrutineering history etc could be switched from one car to another along with the license plate and chassis plate, with obvious logistical advantages. In the case of the Works 240Zs and (few) 260Zs, this was much harder to do. First of all, outside Japan there simply wasn't an available 'stock' of 240Z & 260Z rally cars to switch identities between, and in the case of two Works cars, each would have its own identity (engraved in the firewall sheetmetal for a start...) with which it crossed borders, so there were no Works-spec cars being built-up outside Japan from fresh 'shells. It's also easy to tell the difference between a proper Works car and a privateer-built example. But the bigger question is motive. Why would they do it? Obviously when a car was crashed or otherwise put out of action it could theoretically be useful to pin its identity on another car but, in the case of the Works 240Zs and 260Zs, the car you were pinning that identity on would already have had its own identity and carnet. Why not use that? The exception was when cars were sent out of country, and ostensibly back to Japan, with the identities of Works cars attached to them (in order to satisfy the Carnet), but that takes particular Works car identities OUT of the mix rather than keeping them in it. It also caused all sorts of trouble back in Japan. Heads rolled. These things are for me - generally speaking - only clues in what is in fact the much bigger task of following the careers of genuine Works cars, and what happened to them afterwards.
  4. DatsunPA11

    Ross Dunkerton and Datsun in Australia

    I've been reading this thread and enjoying it very much, but thought I would 'chip-in' with my two-bob's worth. Have to say first-up, the info I'm providing here relates to the later PA10 works cars (160J / Stanza etc) and I fully appreciate Alan's info only relates to the "HS30, HLS30, RS30 and RLS30 240Z & 260z rally cars". For many years now I have studied the works PA10s (and learnt an awful lot from Derek who posted earlier) and collected all the info I can, including a clear example of Nissan in Japan re-using a 'Carnet' export plate. The first pic is the RHD Group 2 SOHC PA10 (Stanza) provided for Ross Dunkerton / Adrian Mortimer in the 1978 Southern Cross Rally. The Japanese plate on this car is TKS57 TE 8013. Second pic is taken from the Nissan / Datsun Race and Rally Digest No. 4, showing Timo Salonen / Seppo Harjanne celebrating second place outright at the 1980 Acropolis Rally, which they claimed in their LHD Group 2 SOHC Datsun 160J, with Japanese plate TKS57 TE 8013. The Dunkerton 1978 Southern Cross car stayed in Australia, forming the basis for his 1979 Australian Rally Championship contender until it was rolled in the 1979 Bega Valley Rally. This was likely within its 12-months carnet period, but beyond that event, its fate is unknown. I doubt Nissan in Japan would have repaired the crunched Dunkerton car then converted it to left hand drive so that it would be re-united with its original plate and shipped off to Greece. As stated clearly above, this is well beyond the Zed period but I did want to show some evidence that plate-swapping by the Japanese works team did take place. Jeff
  5. PeterAllen

    Ross Dunkerton and Datsun in Australia

    Flicking through a few old magazines today and came across this artwork of Gregg Carr's 180B. https://postimg.cc/6TkkCh4Z
  6. HS30-H

    Ross Dunkerton and Datsun in Australia

    With all due respect, I think the above is a fundamental misapprehension of what the Japanese temporary-export 'Carnet' license plates represented. The cars were exported for temporary use, so the import duty in the country of use (in this case, Australia) was suspended. The complete 'Carnet' was a complicated and thorough list of the chattels involved in running one or more of these cars outside Japan, usually several pages long and listing parts by piece-by-piece. As long as the car - and theoretically every single piece listed in the full carnet - left the country in question within the time limit of the carnet (usually one year from date of entry) then there was no penalty to pay. There was no reason or advantage for the Nissan works team to swap one carnet license plate between two cars when they were going in and out of foreign countries. None. Why would you switch a time-limited plate and supporting paperwork (which listed the chassis number, and that chassis number was often 'tagged' with a unique identifier by the customs authority which stamped the carnet, in order to avoid fraudulent use) from one car to another? Once a car had gone back to Japan - usually shagged or at the very least creaking at the seams - there was simply NO reason to use that same number plate again. It simply wouldn't make any logical sense. They could start again with a fresh car and a fresh carnet plate issued by their local licensing authority (Shinagawa, in this case) giving them a clear year of use. Plate swapping - along with chassis plates and supporting paperwork - were switched by works teams (especially Ford UK and BMC, who did it with gay abandon) in that period, but I have seen no evidence that Nissan's works rally team did it with their HS30, HLS30, RS30 and RLS30 240Z & 260z rally cars. Some of the plates themselves (just the plate) got 'retained' as souvenirs, or when cars DID stay on past their carnet and - all duties paid - they had to be put onto a local registration. These plates sometimes turned up attached to a car, but it was not the Nissan works team who were doing it. They had no reason to.
  7. gav240z

    Ross Dunkerton and Datsun in Australia

    Derek, thanks for joining in, but that information above was from Alan @HS30-H.
  8. DerekMelb

    Ross Dunkerton and Datsun in Australia

    I hadn't remembered the name Kobe Seiko for these wheels, so thanks for that factoid. They were a 14" x 6(I think)" dark grey, magnesium wheel that were used by the works at that time as their 14" wheel of choice (before the 14" Gold painted Enkei came on the scene later in 1976) on the 610SSS, HS30 and 710SSS. We broke one on the Z at one stage so decided to see if we could set it alight. It burned very well and oh-so bright! AutoPics have ID'd this as a 260Z but it was actually a 240Z. HKSZ (above) has also reversed his naming of the Zs Ross drove in that era. His own car he drove in 1975 and 1977 (with works 240Z engine and running gear) was a 260Z and the works car was a 240Z. None have survived to my knowledge.
  9. DerekMelb

    Ross Dunkerton and Datsun in Australia

    Interesting info, Gav. Thanks for filling in some gaps for me. Tony Fall rolled this car (or one looking like it) in the 1973 Southern Cross and it was returned to Japan afterward. The car that returned in 1975, with this rego plate, had no signs of being repaired (that I can remember) so my thought is that the works switched the plates onto another car. I believe it was a Safari spec'd Z and the last unused one on the shelf (the team had switched to 710s by then). Ross Dunkerton and John Large ran as a Nissan Australia semi-sponsored entry in the 1975 Southern Cross but had a coming together with a spectator vehicle and retired on night one with a damaged rear arm for which we had no spare at that time. I suspect the crash probably had something to do with it being Ross' first event in a LHD car but his version of events is slightly different. Ross then ran this car with navigator Jeff Beaumont for most of the Australian Championship in 1976, which they won comprehensively – 4 consecutive wins, one 2nd, and one DNF (1st round due to unspecified and not remembered suspension failure, again). Ross also ran it in the Castrol International Rally early that year, coming 3rd to Greg Carr and George Fury. The car was not entered in the Southern Cross in 1976 and its next event was the Alpine Rally later that year in which Dunkerton had a rollover. It was not considered worth repairing and the wreck was given to Ross to use the running gear in his own RHD 260Z. Dunkerton/Beaumont and the works powered 260Z had good success again in 1977 until he lost oll pressure in the penultimate round and the engine was destroyed. They still managed to come equal 1st in the ARC with George Fury in the works 710. I began full-time work with the Datsun Rally Team at the beginning of 1976. We prepared and maintained this LHD 240Z for Ross and an early 710 for George Fury that year.
  10. 240ZR

    WTB: 240Z/260Z Rear view vision mirror

    PM sent. Thanx
  11. Hi Bobby, i'll send you a PM
  12. gav240z

    Replacement seat foam and density?

    Forgot we already had this discussion.
  13. 1600dave

    260z original metallic green pictures, please!

    As was my brother's 2 seater 260Z, until I painted it Toyota Red Mica.....
  14. theremm thanks for your thoughts. By the way what colour is your car? It looks to be a little darker that the 901 silver. I have been agonizing over what colour to do mine when it finally gets done. I had been thinking of orange but that was not a 260Z colour so I am now tending to lean towards something that is correct for a 260.
  15. Roady

    TTT Rear Lowering Control Arms

    As Peter said, 45mm for shank and sleeve is approx. 60mm internal thread length.
  16. Yesterday
  17. Sirpent

    260z original metallic green pictures, please!

    Mine is a 75 coupe and was originally this colour
  18. RB26DETT

    Hitachi radio lens with AM/FM range

    There is one on gumtree in WA
  19. richard260

    Hitachi radio lens with AM/FM range

    if you find it ill buy it if its for sale
  20. Retro Z

    WTB: 240Z/260Z Rear view vision mirror

    I got a few mirrors. But no base plates
  21. Zed Brothers Inc

    Wrecking 280zx 1981

    Hi wrecking a 280zx 1981 model in Brisbane Will most likely be cutting this car up over the weekend pls contact me on 040200 1220 if you are interested in parts ir panels Magnus
  22. Price is probably fair-ish I think, just not much of a market out there for stock mechanical dizzys.
  23. Howdy

    14 X 7 wheels wanted

    G'Day, I'm after at least 2 14x7 or 14X8 wheels to suit standard body S30. Any type but just on the off chance someone has some of these (Delta brand) that would be awesome.
  24. Linton

    WTB: 240Z/260Z Rear view vision mirror

    i have a 260 mirror, i don't need no base it would need to be restored also have heaps of spares from the donor car it will all be going the tip i cannot store it anymore
  25. Last week
  26. Am I asking too much for this stuff or are they things no one wants anymore? If I am asking too much then what are they worth?
  27. I have a set of extractors off my 260Z. Has the rectangular shaped ports. I do not know what brand they are. Includes approx. 180mm of 2 1/2" pipe after the exit flange. They are ceramic coated but the coating is starting to break down in the cluster of pipes just before the exit flange.(see photo) I live in Newcastle NSW. $250.
  28. 260DET

    350Z Race Car Thread?

    Thanks for the encouragement blokes, will do once it's off the hoist and pics can be taken. It's on the hoist that the difference in structure compared with the S30 through to the Z31 is apparent, the Z33's chassis is comparatively massive with aftermarket type braces everywhere, where the extra weight comes from is apparent. First Zed I've four point jacked with the doors still latching perfectly, the Z31 2+2 was terrible in that regard even with a full cage.
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