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Re: Safety factor for age of tires.


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#1 zeds4ever

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:32 PM

:(Now that I have decided to remove the Spoke wheels I'm contemplating on using the tires off them on the rims that will replace them.Problem is I had these tires fitted back in 2006 & these have not been on the road as yet. Have read articles that state that if a tire is over six years age it should not be used on a vehicle.Your thoughts please fella's.

                                  Regards: Alan.  :D

#2 dat2kman

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:47 PM

There are plenty cars with very old, but low km use tyres on them.
As long as no physical damage, no cracking to sidewalls, they should be fine!
Fyi, the very old Michelin X range, i have seen on some, have been over 20 years old, with heaps of cracks in sidewalls, i wouldnt use them, but,,,,,,!i

got a set of quite bald very soft semi slick tarmac Kumho's, that get used only couple times a year, they were bought new in 1999, they are just fine!, and still very grippy for my use

What was the article that said chuck them if over 6 y/o in,,,,,, a tyre manufactures newsletter???

#3 260z.76

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:54 PM

The tires on my 260z are about 8 years old there fine just slippery in the wet a bit

And out landcruiser has 12 year old bfgs

And there fine

#4 gilltech

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 06:25 AM

The issue is that tyre compounds continue to gradually harden over time & lose design performance & flexibility; that compromises safety if they are going to be driven hard. I think it's all very subjective as there are so many different designs of tyres. So best use your discretion.
These days there are plenty of hobby cars out there that wouldn't do enough annual mileage to ever wear out their tyres so the owners should bear that in mind when driving on them. And obviously any tyre that starts to show the least sign of surface cracking should be discarded immediately.
FWIW my old man - who was part of the generation that weathered the 1930's Great Depression followed by WW2 then post-WW2 material shortages - used to buy a set of new tyres (standard passenger car tyres, not performance tyres) & store them away for a year or two before having them fitted to his Holden or Ford sedan in the belief that he would get greater mileage out of them.


#5 MaygZ

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 11:30 AM

I saw an old fella driving a Pord Palcon the other day with what looked like brand new Yoko 352's on it!!  They looked smick and they haven't made that tyre for at least 15 years (prob over 20!)

#6 PZG302

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 03:38 PM

I saw an old fella driving a Pord Palcon the other day with what looked like brand new Yoko 352's on it!!  They looked smick and they haven't made that tyre for at least 15 years (prob over 20!)


Yokohama still make the 352, just F*&^ken expensive and the size you need is always on the next shipment due in a few months, I had been chasing them for my charger for about six months and just gave up and got some other 15's with an old school tread pattern fitted to the performane challengers tucked away under the house.

#7 zeds4ever

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 10:36 PM

;D  Thanx for the feed back gentlemen, much appreciated. By the way I read the article in a car magazine some time back regarding the time factor.

                                                                  Regards: Alan.  :D

#8 tir33d

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 08:46 PM

From a bloke who owns a tyre shop ie - ME
Tyre age, manufacturing processes and use all came to a head years ago with the Ford explorers in US that were killing people - which they eventually put back to the goodyear tyres that were fitted. Cheapest OE tyre available at manufacturers specs.
The age debate came along about 2-3 years ago because of some importers bringing in tyres from the states that were old stock. Back 7 years ago the importer I was working for bought in some aust made goodyears and bridgestones from america. These tyres at the time cost us about 40% less than what we were buying them for here. The tyres were up to 5 years old and we never saw a claim due to age.
I sometimes buy tyres from suppliers even today that are 3-4 years old. It may sit at my shop for another 6 months then be used on a car for another 3 years or more. A manufacturer should cover from date of manufacture for 7 years (goodyear theoretically cover for life).
I regularly see tyres up to 12 years old that are still in shape, but as stated above the grip levels are not there anymore.
Heat and UV light are killers of tyres in storage, provided they are kept well, laying on their side and not in sunlight they should be fine. A old tyre with a problem will generally warn you of a problem by vibrating like it is out of balance prior to having an issue (exploding).
As for the Y352 the tyre is very poorly supported in Aust with very few sizes available. BF Goodrich still does the strange sizes but once again not here (you can import them from the states though). Sumitomo does the fat sizes but they are assymetrical with big white writing on the outside edge (not to everyones tastes). Mastercraft is another US manufactured tyre that do the fat sizes.
The date is shown on one side of the tyre in a little area a little larger than you thumb nail, should be 4 digits ie 0209 (which means 2nd month 2009) any tyre with 3 numbers only are made in the 90's. No date - prob prior to 90's.
Hope it helps.


#9 Dragon3125

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 07:23 PM

Recommend to replace tires if they are 5 years old. No matter what state they are in. That is what I recommend to my customers. As tie33d stated. You can tell how old the tire is by the "xxxx" numbers. ie "3408" = 34th week of year 2008.

#10 44014

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 12:25 PM

From my understandings tyres over 4 years old are no longer considered road worthy. Due to age deterioration , we threw away about 20 tyres 6 months ago at work because of this .

#11 dat2kman

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 01:02 PM

The rubber in the fan belts, and radiator hoses, the door seals, the suspension bushes, etc etc, should all fall into this regime too!
Just keep away from date checking the tyres on most older French/European classic cars, especially Michelin brand tyres, they can last for over 20 years, on Citroens , Peugots and Renaults!

#12 zeds4ever

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 09:23 PM

::) See your point , but if you blow a tire I think that would have more serious consequences wouldn't it.  I'm to old to die yet & I don't want to go out with a bang. LOL.

                                                                                                      Regards: Alan.  :D 

#13 Zedman240®

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 09:57 PM

Belts break, hoses split/explode, bushes perish but tyres are the only thing between you and the road. I prefer nice fresh rubber than 10 year old half plastic/rubber tyres!




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