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#141 d3c0y

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 09:58 AM

Rear brakes are done! I've really enjoyed doing something different with the brakes and not just following the mod your 240Z by numbers approach. BHSS in Capalaba have done all the fab work and Johnny there is an ex240z owner and have been great to work with.
 
The setup we landed on uses the rear Boxster 986 calipers to match the front. While they look the same these have smaller pistons and pads. A VS/VZ HSV rear rotor was bang on for offset, thickness and centre hole, so only required the 4x114.3 PCD drilling to fit and they are cheap at $100ea in an RDA. BHSS said they prefer to buy plain rotors and slot them opposed to the off the shelf RDA slotted as they make the slots too wide and dont offset them on the faces of the rotor so they are noisy and cause vibration, which I can attest to having had those rotors on my 350Z and XR6 ute previously.
 
Here are the numbers for those who care:
 
986 Boxster weight: 1280kg
240Z weight: 1050kg
 
Non 'S':
F Disc 298mm x 24mm, Pistons in Calipers 2x40,2x36 mm , pad area 216 cm^2
R Disc 292mm x 20mm, Pistons in Calipers 2x30,2x28 mm , pad area 196 cm^2
 
"S/996 Carrera":
F Disc 319mm x 28mm, Pistons in Calipers 2x40,2x36 mm, pad area 254 cm^2
R Disc 299mm x 22mm, Pistons in Calipers 2x30,2x28 mm, pad area 196 cm^2
 
"240Z"
F Disc 323mm x 24mm (RX-8 Sport), Pistons in Calipers 2x40,2x36 mm , pad area 216 cm^2
R Disc 315mm x 18mm (HSV), Pistons in Calipers 2x30,2x28 mm , pad area 196 cm^2
 
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My friend went a different route with his 260Z and got all new gear from one of those China/Taiwanese brands, Ceika to be specific. The cost has turned out to be pretty much the same, his brakes are bigger 6 piston calipers with 335mm front rotors, but heavier components, brackets etc. However, he is still trying to deal with some guy overseas to get parts changed that don't quite fit (probably a bit his fault as he left it so long to get back to the guy). I think that using Australian based suppliers for this kind of custom is definitely the right way to go and is the reason I ended up with MCA doing the suspension. I actually looked into Ceika doing a custom suspension setup as it was really really cheap, but the lack of communication and trying to relay details over email did my head in and promptly got him to refund the money. Just my observations from having done this sort of stuff for the first time and obviously nothing new here, but you can beat being able to pick up the phone or go and see the guys with the parts.

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#142 260DET

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 10:13 AM

Pretty impressive brakes, being off a P car a good assortment of pads will be readily available too. Another way to go with suspension is to get a well made set from another supplier, like Arizona Z, and then if necessary get MCA to do their magic if you want them improved.



#143 d3c0y

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 12:52 PM

MCA did it for what i thought was a very reasonable price. I just got the blues (even though the bits are red) and will have them re-valve it when the package is together and can be tested.



#144 CBR Jeff

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 07:31 PM

Boxster calipers are a great option. Readily avalable lots of pad options etc etc. Great choice. So is your choice on the MCA kit. I think you have hit the nail on the head with being able to deal with a local company. That added to Murray and Josh's comitment and knowledge is hard to go past. I went for the reds after talking to Josh about plans for the car.
Great work
Jeff.

#145 d3c0y

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 07:25 PM

Hey Jeff i'm interested in what spring rates you went with on your setup?



#146 d3c0y

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 06:40 PM

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I've been doing some suspension work recently, to get some bits back in the car and in the process, clear off the work bench. Disks, hubs, bearings, lower struts, and calipers for both ends of the car spread out a lot when they are all separated. So to start the reassembly process, I needed to perform a modification to the lower strut that I had been putting off; not that every modification remaining to do to the car doesn't fall into that category at this point.

The coilover setup I used has an inverted mono-tube damper for the front, which when modifying old struts that have the knuckle on the bottom means you end up with the problem of your adjuster knob being inside the tube. This proved to be a massive pain in ass for tweaking the suspension setup another 240Z we built (red one for those who follow SMG) so for the 240Z-G I did some research on the best way to address this.

 

Front shock is far left, the other two are the rears.

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The trick to making easy adjustments is to use shock adjust extensions, which is basically a cable that is secured to the standard adjuster with an allen screw in a cap that fits over the top. It sounds a bit crazy, but talking to people in the suspension know, it's fine to drill a hole in the side of the strut to route the cable through and it doesn't affect the strength of the strut at all. Some coilovers have large windows cut in the side of the strut big enough to get your finds inside to access the adjuster without even using an extension.

 

The next consideration when making this modification, is to get the hole low enough in the strut so the metal cable can make a gentle radius inside and have enough room to wind the shock down in the strut to get your optimal strut length.

 

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The cable can't do a 90 degree turn inside the space of the strut either, so drilling the hole on a 45 degree angle down helped this a lot. You will need to make sure your pilot holes are drilled as close to this angle as you can, as in the case of the 240Z the bottom is very thick and just levering the drill up and down won't get the desired result. My hole was close but I did snap a 10mm drill bit trying to relieve the hole a bit more on the first one finding the right angle.

So we finally get to the end product of adjustable shocks again! I really like the size of the damper in a McPherson strut setup like the zed and with a small amount of work you can have the best of both worlds!


Edited by d3c0y, 06 February 2017 - 06:40 PM.

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