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So broke - where to start


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#21 Luni260z

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 09:53 PM

Just be careful with this one! Use the urethane on the front of the rod, but NOT on the back!

The radius rod is a solid piece of steel and if there is no give it WILL fatigue and potentially snap... Trust me. Use the urethane on the front to keep the car from squirming under brakes and use a rubber one on the back to keep it supple enough to not fatigue the rod. Best of both worlds :)


Thanks Whittie, I'll hopefully remember to find out what a radius rod is before I go ahead with this.

#22 Tj

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 10:14 PM

Just be careful with this one! Use the urethane on the front of the rod, but NOT on the back!

The radius rod is a solid piece of steel and if there is no give it WILL fatigue and potentially snap... Trust me. Use the urethane on the front to keep the car from squirming under brakes and use a rubber one on the back to keep it supple enough to not fatigue the rod. Best of both worlds

Thanks Whittie, I'll hopefully remember to find out what a radius rod is before I go ahead with this.



At the risk of sounding rude this made me giggle a little bit. We all have to learn somewhere  :)
As someone who's about to dive into repairing the suspension on a Zed for the first time myself I found that bit of info a good idea. I remember recently seeing something with a radius rod type front end break a rod at a motorkhana or a khanacross or something, that was probably why.

#23 Luni260z

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 11:07 PM


At the risk of sounding rude this made me giggle a little bit. We all have to learn somewhere  :)


I'm the first to admit I'm out of my depth when it comes to cars. Slowly slowly learning as things get replaced.

I'm going to update my signature to "Please explain things to me like I'm 5".

#24 nizm0zed

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 09:20 AM

Here's some pics i found that may help you out.

Posted Image
This is the rear suspension on the zed, pretty much exactly as pictured.
the part labeled No.2 'differential case mounting, rear member' is commonly known as a moustache bar.
That'll come up later.
This pic was found here, http://zhome.com/ZCMnL/tech/R200.htm
I would suggest having a good look around, you'll get some good info there.


Posted Image
this is very similar to the front suspension on our cars.
This one is for a front wheel drive, notice the holes in the front hubs where the axles would go through. (labeled as no. 8 'Front wheel knuckle')
On the zed, the strut goes down to the bottom of the hub, there is no hole for the axle.
Item no. 9, listed as 'front suspension lower arm strut' Is better known as the radius rod.
If you take your wheel off and have a look, you'll see it has a big round bush that goes into the body, then it bolts onto the control arm with 2 bolts, just behind the ball joint.
a keen eye will also notice that the stabilizer bar, or sway bar as its commonly known, connects to the strut in that pic.
In our cars, it connects to the control arm at roughly the same point as the radius rod bolts on.

You may also find this handy.
(taken from the Nolathane website, http://www.nolathane.com.au/faq.php )

Camber Angle, what is it & what to look for?
Camber is the measurement of the inclination of the wheel from the vertical, viewed from the front of the vehicle. Camber's main purpose is to reduce uneven tyre wear on the edges of the tyres by maintaining even contact across the entire tread surface. The vehicle has "+" positive camber when the top of the tyre leans outwards away from the vehicle and has "-" negative camber when the top of the tyre leans inwards towards the vehicle. Under normal driving conditions original rubber bushings or worn components distort and squirm causing the suspension arm to move altering camber setting, resulting in unwanted angle changes. Nolathane suspension products are far superior in maintaining proper camber settings because they do not distort as much as the original rubber components.
What to look for: Smooth edging on the inside of the tyre is caused by excessive "-" camber, smooth edging on the outside of the tyre is caused by excessive"+" camber causing the vehicle to pull to the side with most "+" camber. Always wheel align camber settings within manufacturer's specifications.


Caster Angle, what is it & what to look for?
Camber is the measurement of the angle of forward and backward tilt of the upper and lower steering pivots (i.e. top and bottom ball joints) relative to an imaginary vertical line intersecting the road surface, also measured in "+" positive and "-" negative degrees. Caster is the angle that most effects directional stability. "+" caster occurs when the contact patch of the tyres is behind this imaginary line, "-" caster being in front of the line. Ideally the contact patch of the tyres would be "+" providing steering 'feel', stability and helping to self Centre the wheels, so they point in the direction the vehicle is traveling. Too much caster causes heavy steering and when extreme, can cause wheel shimmy. Too little caster reduces steering feel and the vehicle's ability to track straight and has a tendency to wander. Under heavy braking and steering conditions, original rubber or worn components can cause caster angle change effecting the vehicle's self-centring ability and reducing turn-in ability when cornering. Nolathane suspension products provide better control under all conditions, especially braking, controlling and preventing movement. Negative effects caused by the camber of the road can be counteracted by increasing the caster of the vehicle on the passenger side by approximately 1/2°. This spread is provided by Nolathane's range of offset caster bushings reducing LH tyre wear, rectifying a slight pull to the LHS, common in many front wheel drive vehicles.
What to look for: Unless there is excessive "+" caster on cars not designed to have such setting, caster will not cause tyre wear. Always wheel align caster settings within manufacturer's specifications.


Toe In / Toe Out, what is it & what to look for?
Toe is the measurement of the difference between the front centre line of each tyre and the rear centre line of each tyre on the same axle. Incorrect toe settings are one of the main causes of excessive tyre wear, notably feathered edging across the tyres, is due to incorrect toe settings due to the tyres trying to run in different directions. Vague, unresponsive steering is indicative of excessive toe in, whereas excessive toe out causes the vehicle to dart or wander across the road. Toe angle is measured in "degrees" or "mm" by subtracting the distance between the front of the tyres from the distance between the back of the same tyre. A "+"result means the vehicle is toeing in, a "-" result means the vehicle is toeing out. Typically production vehicles are normally aligned with a "Toe In" setting as steering alignment takes place while the vehicle is stationary. When the vehicle is in motion steering linkage tolerances allow the wheels to move out under normal driving conditions. This is referred to as "Running Toe" which should be zero to maximize tyre life and achieve the least rolling resistance. Toe Settings can be altered because of soft original rubber bushings or worn components allow the control arms to move during performance driving, heavy braking and cornering causing toe out. Nolathane suspension products are far superior in maintaining proper toe settings under performance situations, when weight transfer is high, such as acceleration, braking and cornering as they do not distort like the original rubber components.
What to look for: Feathered edges on the tyres indicates incorrect toe setting. Feathering pointing to the inside of the tyre indicates excessive toe in, whereas feathering to the outside of the tyre indicates excessive toe out. Always wheel align toe settings within manufacturer's specifications.


What is the function of the Sway Bar?
The function of sway bar is to improve the tyre contact with the road, thus reducing body roll and stabilising the vehicle under lateral (cornering) loads. Soft original rubber bushings will often deflect excessively before the sway bar begins to operate, therefore permitting initial body roll. Nolathane suspension products allow the sway bar to work with much higher efficiency as the bushings do not distort, resulting in improved performance, control, less tyre wear and better traction.


#25 nizm0zed

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 09:37 AM

oh, id also recommend a GOOD look through here.
http://www.zhome.com.../TechPosts.html

#26 FLEXZED

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 06:37 PM

Hey Sam
If youneed a hand and tools let me know and we can  learn  on  your  caar

Loui

#27 Luni260z

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Posted 19 August 2011 - 12:04 AM

Thanks nizm0zed .. that is the most i've learnt about suspension .. well ever I imagine.
And thanks Loui. Would love a little help in the future.

The last time I was at your place I had more issues fixed in a few hours than I'd done in a year.

;)

#28 tbscobraZ

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Posted 20 August 2011 - 12:33 PM

Welcome to the young guys without money that own zeds group! Where abouts in Sydney are you? Best of luck with it.

#29 Luni260z

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 11:43 AM

I turn 36 next week . not sure how young that makes me.
Definitely fit into the no money category.

Live in the Inner West, near Five Fock.




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