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Home Built Z 'full Video Build'


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#21 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 09:39 AM

Well done, just goes to show that with a little more time spent you could do a significantly better job as an amatuer on that bonnet than most lazy bog and flog shops.

Your tool was a good idea, I've also thought of using a regular slide hammer and welding on small nails. I like a slide hammer because it is literally the same as an easy beat.

The main reasons why I didn't do a slide hammer is that, firstly I don't have one, so I would have to buy or make one. Secondly was, how do I grab the head of the nail with the slide hammer.

 

The main thing I do like about the lever method though, it that I think you have a bit more control when you are pulling the dent, so you don't over pull it. My bonnet is never going to be as nice as yours, and as you can see, it will need a light skim of bog to finish it off, but I am OK with that.


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#22 gav240z

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 09:44 AM

The main reasons why I didn't do a slide hammer is that, firstly I don't have one, so I would have to buy or make one. Secondly was, how do I grab the head of the nail with the slide hammer.

 

The main thing I do like about the lever method though, it that I think you have a bit more control when you are pulling the dent, so you don't over pull it. My bonnet is never going to be as nice as yours, and as you can see, it will need a light skim of bog to finish it off, but I am OK with that.

 

I would have used a small washer to hook into (sorry I edited my post after I wrote it to include that so you may have missed it). You're correct that you could over pull the dent with a slide hammer if you got carried away. My slide hammer has a lot of weight in it, so just gentle taps would do a lot of work. If you happen to over pull you could tap down with a hammer but you're working the metal a lot, and as you found out the metal is quite thin (when you blew through it with the Mig) so you need to be careful how much you work it.

 

RE: My bonnet, you have also spend significantly less time on your bonnet than I have on mine and I'm still not happy with mine. :D


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#23 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 09:49 AM

RE: My bonnet, you have also spend significantly less time on your bonnet than I have on mine and I'm still not happy with mine. :D

 

You have another bonnet as well don't you, so you can take your time and just get it right. In the end you are learning the whole time which is always a win.



#24 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 06:41 AM

This week I tackle stretched sheet metal with the bonnet repairs, and I start pulling apart the engine.
 


#25 Brabham

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 11:42 AM

Good work Jeff. Another way to clean up the rust areas under the bonnet skin where you removed the section is to blast it outside with a hand held garnet gun. You end up covered in garnet but it removes all the rust and you can then hit it with zinc gal. To reduce warpage when you are doing large flat sections, just do it one tack at a time and move around the patch using an air gun to cool it down, it looked like you had run a bead along the join, it should be a series of spots. I would recommend James at MIA for engines, but it wouldn't be home built then!
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#26 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 06:11 PM

Good work Jeff. Another way to clean up the rust areas under the bonnet skin where you removed the section is to blast it outside with a hand held garnet gun. You end up covered in garnet but it removes all the rust and you can then hit it with zinc gal. To reduce warpage when you are doing large flat sections, just do it one tack at a time and move around the patch using an air gun to cool it down, it looked like you had run a bead along the join, it should be a series of spots. I would recommend James at MIA for engines, but it wouldn't be home built then!

I did tack and cool, tack and cool. I have done it a multitude of different ways, and from my (admittedly limited) experience, if you are doing a large repair on a flat panel, it is always going to warp a bit. I did run some short beads in sections, as often even at the lowest setting, the tacks would blow through. It was easier with a bit of movement, to spread the heat and stop the blow through. The beads were still probably only 2 second welds on one spot, cool, move to the other end for the next one and so on. I will be doing plenty more of that sort of welding in the next few weeks, so I should hopefully be able to get some footage instead of stuffing up the camera again  :P  



#27 gav240z

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 12:13 AM

With the heat shrinking it looked like you put quite a bit of heat into the panel, you don't need to add a lot of heat, it's literally on for a couple of seconds and then off again. Better to do lots of small heat shrinks than big ones! Good that it seems to have fixed it for you though all the same.

 

Not much you can do about the surface rust under the skin of the bonnet, when you cannot access that area. You could try dipping the panel and converting rust that way, but if you're going to use fish oil make sure you do it after you're finished painting (not before) as it can lead to "fish eyes" in the paint etc..

 

By the way is the motor head a P90a? I'll bet it had compression but you need to work on your guns and turn the motor with more effort :D. It probably would have run ok, but worth re-lapping valves etc.. cleaning it up from all that carbon build up and doing something about the camshaft. It's probably sat for many years like that.



#28 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 06:39 AM

With the heat shrinking it looked like you put quite a bit of heat into the panel, you don't need to add a lot of heat, it's literally on for a couple of seconds and then off again. Better to do lots of small heat shrinks than big ones! Good that it seems to have fixed it for you though all the same.

 

Not much you can do about the surface rust under the skin of the bonnet, when you cannot access that area. You could try dipping the panel and converting rust that way, but if you're going to use fish oil make sure you do it after you're finished painting (not before) as it can lead to "fish eyes" in the paint etc..

 

By the way is the motor head a P90a? I'll bet it had compression but you need to work on your guns and turn the motor with more effort :D. It probably would have run ok, but worth re-lapping valves etc.. cleaning it up from all that carbon build up and doing something about the camshaft. It's probably sat for many years like that.

Good to know with the heat levels. I went off of some dodgy backyard youtube video, as I couldn't find anything more current. I will keep that in mind for the rest of the repairs.

 

The head is a 90a. What one of the YouTube comments mentioned was that as it has hydraulic lifters, it would need oil pressure to get full tension on the valves.

 

My plan now is to do a full rebuild. I just need to think about how far I want to go. I at least want to put in a mild cam. Basically I am looking to do something that is still streetable, but getting a bit more out of it. I plan on keeping it naturally aspirated (love that noise  :) ), with some sort of triple carbs (brand to be determined).

 

Any suggestions are more than welcome. I am looking for a nice build, that I can do myself, and that others can reasonably replicate. 



#29 gav240z

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 11:30 AM

The head is a 90a. What one of the YouTube comments mentioned was that as it has hydraulic lifters, it would need oil pressure to get full tension on the valves.

 

90a or P90a? I've never heard of a 90a before. If it's a P90a then yes they had hydraulic lifters but apparently they can go bad and you can replace them with the older style lifters relatively easily I believe.

 

As for suggestions on the engine, have you read this thread yet?

http://www.viczcar.c...re-the-results/

 

I like it because it's very methodical in it's approach, but yields excellent results and drivability. It shouldn't break the bank.



#30 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 12:43 PM

It is a P90a sorry. I will have to check the lifters to see how they are.

 

I will check out that thread now, thanks.



#31 Andrew_L26

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 08:41 PM

I'd just like to add that not all P90a heads had hydraulic lifters from my knowledge.

Loving the build!

 

Andrew



#32 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 08:49 PM

I'd just like to add that not all P90a heads had hydraulic lifters from my knowledge.

Loving the build!

 

Andrew

Ok, that is something I have to look into then. I did read on one site that said that was the difference between the P90 and the P90a, but just because it is on the internet, definitely doesn't mean it is true  ;)



#33 gav240z

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 10:45 PM

It is a P90a sorry. I will have to check the lifters to see how they are.

 

I will check out that thread now, thanks.

 

By the way this might be useful to you.

 


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#34 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 07:56 PM

This week I tear down the bottom end of my L28 and repair some rust holes in my front cowl.
 

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#35 gav240z

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 10:01 AM

Well the fender repair was good, the cowl panel... hmmm not so much lol..

 

I have a spare cowl panel here that was given to me, it is also warped because of someone using a mig welder (so the whole panel has twisted) but that area that looks less than ideal on your 1 (passenger side upper corner) could probably be cut out and used.

 

Let me know if you want it? I have good cowl panels on my cars (no previous owners did poor repair work on them). So I don't really have a use for it other than a spare.



#36 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 12:13 PM

Well the fender repair was good, the cowl panel... hmmm not so much lol..

 

I have a spare cowl panel here that was given to me, it is also warped because of someone using a mig welder (so the whole panel has twisted) but that area that looks less than ideal on your 1 (passenger side upper corner) could probably be cut out and used.

 

Let me know if you want it? I have good cowl panels on my cars (no previous owners did poor repair work on them). So I don't really have a use for it other than a spare.

Sweet. I will see how it goes, when I have to start lining everything up properly. If it is too far out I will hit you up. What I do need is an old dead engine someone has lying around, as mine was stripped, but didn't come with all of the nuts and bolts. They are not easy to replace.



#37 gav240z

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 01:03 PM

I believe many fasteners are still available from Nissan particularly those for the engine as the L-series was used for so long on so many cars.
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#38 AndBir

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 05:27 PM

Pity they are not in NSW however these cowl panels look in good shape should you find you need a straight one.

 

https://www.gumtree....els-/1162776558


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#39 MATTY

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 06:09 PM

also don't know if anyone's mentioned it (well not what i could see) grinding back your welds can also distort the panel if the grinder is in the same spot too long best to try to keep grinding evenly across the welded surface.


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#40 HomeBuiltByJeff

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 06:18 PM

also don't know if anyone's mentioned it (well not what i could see) grinding back your welds can also distort the panel if the grinder is in the same spot too long best to try to keep grinding evenly across the welded surface.

I actually think the grinder caused more heat into the panel and more warping than the welder did. I am biting the bullet and getting a 5 inch grinder this week and also some super coarse discs. As someone commented on Facebook, the bigger the disc and the faster it takes away material, the less heat that is transferred.


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