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Mikuni Carburettor Id Thread - Phh


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#21 RobDC

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 06:21 PM

Hey guys, pretty new member, first post, bought the "One for the brave" 240 from dolls point (11162) and am yet to start the project but doing some research.

Among other things, at the moment looking at carby setups, have decided to go for triple mikuni/solex 44, and have learnt (Via this very helpful forum) that there are a few different versions.

I can't tell but hope that someone can whether this (pic below) is a homogenous or independent jet block:

Cheers,

Rob

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#22 gav240z

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 09:54 PM

I believe you cannot tell from just removing the jet covers. You'll need to remove the jet block which requires you to remove the accelerator pump from the bottom of the body. Don't worry it's not too hard to do, just don't lose the ball bearings when you remove the top cover (part of accelerator pump assembly).

 

There might be a way to tell if homogenous / independent with the block in place, I believe what you need to do is remove the pilots and use a thin bit of wire and probe it down into the jet block (where pilot sits), if it goes down into the accelerator pump area (straight through) it's independent, but if it encounters resistance or has a turn, then it's homogenous. (The Mikuni Manual makes reference to this, but it's not very clear looking at the diagram vs the carb bodies themselves).

 

From what I have gathered, homogenous was used more or less with OE equipment (say Toyota's etc..) and independent (better for racing) was used as aftermarket carbs. The homogenous design is apparently meant to feel very much like fuel injection (smooth transition) where as independent may not be as smooth. This is all second hand information though and not information I've managed to verify for myself. So open to correction.



#23 24OUNZ

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 07:22 PM

This link will tell you. I've found it very useful

http://www.wolfcreek...id=30&Itemid=51

Cheers

#24 gav240z

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 07:34 PM

This link will tell you. I've found it very useful

http://www.wolfcreek...id=30&Itemid=51

Cheers

 

Yeah that is a good resource, although I find it easier to understand now that I'm a lot more familiar with all the different variants and have seen photos of each kind. Trying to rely on the illustrations on that page alone is quite difficult.



#25 RobDC

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 01:05 AM

Appreciate the info for my previous question Gav, I was hoping to buy the mikuni's but missed them. Have picked up a cheap triple Weber setup to experiment and familiarise myself with for now.

Cheers

#26 gav240z

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 03:34 PM

Another site I've found a few times and referenced.

http://rmcarburetors.net/



#27 scott

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 10:02 PM

I have used this site as reference a few times, plenty of good info on there http://www.power-planning.com/



#28 gav240z

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 09:53 AM

So just thought I'd share some tips on how to identify a 40mm carb vs 44mm carb.

 

1. 40mm carbs often have an extra retaining fastener on the bottom (front of the intake portion). Where as 44's are usually blank.

 

post-1-0-59318400-1481854212.jpg

trip44smik5.jpg

 

2. Just by looking at the throttle plates you can often tell what size they are.

40snew3.jpg

44newC.jpg

 

3. Ideally the seller shows a photo of the throttle plate stamping, which will read 1.75inch (44mm) or 1.65inch (40mm). I tried to find a reference photos for 50's but couldn't see 1.

post-1-0-42361500-1481854652.jpg

 

Of course carbs have been messed around with over the years, taper bore etc.. so use this post as a guide but not the gospel. This is just what I've picked up hunting down carbs on various classified sites over the last year or so..






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