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Re-keying Locks?


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#1 Kirby

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 03:02 PM

So I have my ignition and drivers door on one key, my fuel and passenger door on another key and my hatch on a 3rd (and yet to be found key).

Does anyone have any experience with any old-school locksmiths that I could send everything too and have re-keyed? Recommendations appreciated.

I'm contemplating something like this:http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/IGNITION-BARREL-STEERING-LOCK-2-DOOR-LOCKS-SUIT-260-Z-NISSAN-260Z-74-78-/251409335512?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_15&hash=item3a892a04d8

And have my hatch and fuel door re-keyed to suit.



#2 gilltech

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 06:07 PM

Something isn't quite right there. The ignition key should be one key on it's own, & the 2 x doors, hatch, fuel filler door & glovebox all share the other. (Not all cars have locking fuel filler door and/or glovebox, often depends on which market they were destined for).
The ignition key & door keys are quite different shapes, the former is a single edge & the latter a double edge. That's the way it is on my early 260 2-seat anyway, & other Zeds I've known. If your ignition really is a double-edge then either Nissan made a change with later 260's (can anyone here confirm?) or someone else has.
Remove all the barrels & take the whole lot to a locksmith who does auto stuff - a proper shop, not a key cutting kiosk in a shopping centre - & see what they can do for you with what you've got. I've had such things sorted out in the past without any dramas.
If you do need to buy replacement key/lock sets check that the configuration matches, some kits are generic & the tangs need altering to suit - there was a thread on this forum just recently about doing just that on a 2+2 as it noted that the locks are different to those on the 2-seaters (extra opening latches on the longer doors).
Hope that helps.

#3 cracker

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 11:05 PM

Agree with Gilltech on the point that the ignition key should be one sided (at least as far as I know).

If you are happy with a two sided ignition key this is great because you'll be able to have one key to fit all locks on your car.

If I were you I'd be removing the barrels on passenger door, hatch and fuel cap, and taking them, along with the key from the drivers door - take them to a good auto locksmith who should be able to match them up.

I need to get a similar thing done with mine, except I have a single sided ignition key so will have 2 keys at a minimum.

#4 PB260Z

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 11:29 PM

This is making me wonder if later model ignition barrels can be fitted to S30's ???
In the 90's my Grandparents had a Pulsar and it only had the key.

anyone ever tried something similar ?

#5 gilltech

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Posted 04 July 2015 - 11:50 AM

My mother had a Pulsar in the '80's & it just used the one key.
Maybe a full set of locks from a later Nissan could be used on our S30s when the existing ones become too worn out.
The ignition key might be a hassle though, given that the wiring wouldn't be plug'n'play, & newer cars often have steering locks.

#6 PeterH

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 04:56 PM

This might be a bit late but might of interest.



I had a car broken into quite a while ago and one thing that was taken was a spare key to the car.... don't ask the obvious ...I guess they didn't want the car..... the same key was used for ignition and other locks....I bought a new ignition switch and had a locksmith re key the other locks to suit.
All the locks on my 240Z has quite a loose fit With key. I managed to get a new tailgate lock from MSA and bought a set of non genuine door and fuel door locks on eBay..... I dismantled the locks and re arranged the bits to suit the tail gate key ( genuine Nissan ) the only problem was getting the trim off and back on again without damageing it.
Hope this might be of some use.

#7 gilltech

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 08:51 PM

Ditto PeterH, like him I was able to carefully ease the bright trim off one of my door locks to dismantle it & fix a problem - bent plates inside due to something other than a key forced into it - then neatly close it up again, they're pretty basic little bits of engineering.

#8 gav240z

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 11:10 PM

This might be a bit late but might of interest.


Thanks awesome.

#9 Andrew_L26

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 10:07 AM

Sorry to reboot an oldish thread but I wanted to confirm that on a late 260z the ignition key and door keys were different from factory? If so may I ask why this is the case?



#10 gav240z

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 01:12 PM

Yes ignition and door keys were different. As to why? I'm not sure.



#11 Enzo

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 02:17 PM

Hi Guys,

             As a retired Locksmith of 30 odd years I can't give a definitive answer as to why the ignition lock was different to the doors. The ignition lock had a single sided key with pin tumblers in the cylinder. These were sturdier and didn't wear out as quick as the flat wafers in the door locks. It may have been for better security because there was less of a likelihood of another key working in the ignition lock than in the door locks with their flat wafer design.

By the way. A lot of car locks wear out quicker these days because of all of the extra weight and crap hanging off key rings. The extra weight tends to wear the soft metal inside the lock that holds the key in the correct position. The more it wears the more the key will tend to catch or not turn correctly. When this happens replace with new locks, not crap from the wrecking yard.

The ignition internal cylinder can be replaced with another model cylinder to take the double sided key and then matched to the doors. I have one key that does all my locks on the 260z. With the alarm and central locking on my car, having the original pin tumbler single sided key was not necessary.

Hope this helps :)

David.



#12 oldmates260z

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 03:14 PM

Is there any locksmiths around (preferably Brisbane ) that can re-key locks? I have a few sets I would like to be done. Really do not want to have to buy new door and boot locks.

#13 Enzo

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 04:15 PM

Lots in Brisbane. Let your fingers do the walking. (Yellow Pages)

Let them have a look at the locks and they should advise you if the locks are worth rekeying. Bear in mind that a worn lock may allow other keys to work as well. The wafers cut into the soft metal housing over time, especially if it has been used with a badly cut key. That's why when in the business I would advise customers again getting keys cut at Hardware stores such as Bunnings. With the volume of keys that they cut, the cutting wheels wear and the tolerances on the key are not correct. Then if you copy off a badly cut key the tolerances get worse causing wear in the lock. And so it goes on. Same with all locks. A badly cut key may not work in a house lock because the tolerances are tighter and the components are made of brass. With a car lock it is mostly die-cast soft metal to keep the price down. Later model cars have better design and quality locks than our classics.

David.


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#14 oldmates260z

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 06:49 PM

Thanks Dave, easier than I thought....






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