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gav240z

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America? Rear marker/ side lights and left hand drive?

 

 

How can you tell its LHD?

 

 

But yes you win based on rear markers and what Gav said about the fuel door cover.

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Early Girl AU Delivered 240z.

unnamed.jpg

Note: Vents on rear hatch, the fender mirrors and 240z side emblem/badges on the 1/4 panels.

 

Sadly I don't know where the photo was taken or what year for that matter, it was a photo Lindsay Drife shared with me over email when we discussed some of the early 240z's (HS30 00150) etc..

 

unnamed+%25281%2529.jpg

 

I did get this also, however no chassis ID, only engine #. I was told The Motor Registration Branch MRB never recorded chassis numbers, just engine numbers until the late 80's when they became Vicroads. Sound familiar? It might to those who have been following this thread:

http://www.viczcar.com/forum/index.php?topic=14462.0

 

The car might be long dead by now, I was told the last time that car was seen was at DatZed - 715 Dandenong Road Cnr of Raleigh St. Malvern in 1983. It was traded in for a new 260Z 2+2 in 1977.

 

W.Z Zcar register has no record of that engine number: L24-013045

 

Would be nice to know if it has survived all these years though...

 

Postcode looks like Balaclava / East St.Kilda - I actually can't believe how many Zeds were in those postcode areas. I guess with Zshop nearby that might have something to do with it.

 

 

 

 

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By the way does anyone know who ran DatZed - 715 Dandenong Road Cnr of Raleigh St. Malvern in 1983 ? The whole area appears to have changed since then and I can't find any record of what the workshop was or who ran it.

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My point being that the use of the term "matching numbers" in relation to a Japanese market S30-series Z is essentially meaningless. The car may well have its original engine (and if the original paperwork with the car backs that up, then all well and good), but what numbers "match"? There's no engine number on the tag. That's the point.

 

The "matching number" American cars I'm referring to are not Japanese cars...

 

"Matching numbers" in Australia, simply means the car has the original engine it left the factory with (as evidenced by paperwork or ID tags i.e. the stamped engine number, is the same as the engine number on the id tag, or sales documentation).  The American definition of the term (where the cars engine and body both had the same number) is not what we mean down under. Hence, the Australian definition of the term can be applied to most cars regardless of where they were built.

 

 

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"Matching numbers" in Australia, simply means the car has the original engine it left the factory with (as evidenced by paperwork or ID tags i.e. the stamped engine number, is the same as the engine number on the id tag, or sales documentation).  The American definition of the term (where the cars engine and body both had the same number) is not what we mean down under. Hence, the Australian definition of the term can be applied to most cars regardless of where they were built.

 

I take your point Mr C. but my point is that - in the case of the car we are talking about - Nissan never stamped the engine number on anything except the block itself. Describing such a car as having "matching numbers" when the only place where the numbers match is on pieces of paper seems slightly arch at the very least. All the more so when there were indeed some S30-series Z cars that did have the original engine number stamped on a plate that was attached to the body.

 

In my view - and this is generally the case in Japan, where most of the 432s and 432-Rs are - the best way is simply to say "original engine". And even then we are usually only talking about the block casting itself. I know the vast majority of Japanese market S30-series Z owners in Japan wouldn't use such a term in reference to such a car. They'd actually be more likely to be discussing whether it still has its original K3 cylinder head or not, and whether its got all the other correct factory parts attached to it... 

 

How about a case where such a car might very well still have its original engine block, but doesn't have the paperwork to back it up? A good example might be my KPGC10: I don't have any of the original sales paperwork for the car - most such cars have lost them along the way - but it's very likely that it has still got its original engine block. Is it a "matching numbers" car? Obviously not. But - in my view - that's the 'wrong' expression anyway...

 

I know I'm probably labouring the point, but it just sounds wrong to me. Like 'Series 1' and 'Series 2' and all that stuff when applied to non-North American market cars. Sorry.         

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Hi Lurch,

            Thanks for showing a picture of you next project. ;D

Even with your talents you may have to let this one go, unless you have a spare 25 years.

David

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^^ Still not as bad as HS30 00019 hehe. Sorry George.

 

I don't know why, but I kinda like the look of that 2+2 without the front fenders and rear hatch window from that angle. Would make a great rat rod! :)

 

It also looks like the Fiat is winning the 'rust race'.

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Haha yeah apparently they are pretty good at that. Probably only race it would win.

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^^ Still not as bad as HS30 00019 hehe. Sorry George.

 

 

:P

 

I still question my sanity Gav. I must be a rare kind of silly to try and restore that hunk of rust.

 

I was at an electricians place of business over the weekend and he had a couple of Yank classics, one of which was a nice late 50's convertible Corvette. We got to chatting and I was asking him about wiring up new looms so my car came up. Inevitably, after I've shown him photos, he ends up shaking his head wondering what's wrong with me. So here is this car enthusiast that has worked on classic cars throughout his career and he just doesn't get why I would want to spend so much on a Datsun. A colleague of his who was fresh from Greece and couldn't speak English was there and this electrician is translating what I'm saying to him and both of them, make that three of them with their apprentice, are standing there shaking their heads. I felt like I was a wonder of pity on display.

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I knew of DatZed when they were in Moorabbin  &  Frank Guilfoyle was the owner

Frank Kilfoyle !

He moved onto setting up RallyeQuip in Glenhuntly Rd ( can't recall the Suburb name)

Frank won a Victorian Rally Championship or two in the Z!

 

He was a very nice bloke, helped plenty with lots of advice.

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Hi Gav240,

 

This question was brought to my attention recently by other members of this group and as a result, I am now a member as well...

 

Anyway, the answer is, it was me!

 

I was joined a couple of years after establishing the business by my very competent partner Steve Newing, until such time as we sold it all to Frank after approximately 10 successful years of operation...

 

Why, do you ask? Do you have a warranty claim?

 

Best regards from far away Germany,

 

Dave Hogan

 

 

 

 

 

By the way does anyone know who ran DatZed - 715 Dandenong Road Cnr of Raleigh St. Malvern in 1983 ? The whole area appears to have changed since then and I can't find any record of what the workshop was or who ran it.

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Hi Dave,

Actually I wanted to know purely for selfish reasons. I'm currently restoring an early 240z (HS30 00150) and I'm lead to believe that the original L24 block was probably replaced with an L28 block when the car had work done at DatZed sometime in the 80s, some people will think I'm crazy still trying to track down it's original block and it's more than likely it was sent to sims scrap metal, but you never know until you ask and I figured someone at DatZed may be able to give me some more history on the car. It's always nice to know more about such a car's past.

 

If you're interested in the project you can read pages of waffle here:

http://www.viczcar.com/forum/index.php/topic,13624.0.html

 

It sounds like you're a long way away from Australia these days. Enjoying retirement perhaps?

 

PS: I knew I'd heard the name Steve Newing before. Seems he did a lot of the work that was done on this Z.

http://www.autospeed.com/cms/article.html?&title=Yella-Delight&A=108383

 

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Hi Gav,

 

Although it was many years ago, we at DATZED were rather reluctant to separate the so called "Early Girls" from their correctly numbered components.

 

Yours being No. 150, we would have certainly suggested, even in the case of an engine swap, that the owner should keep the original engine block for posterity.

 

We knew that eventually, matching numbers would be a valuable asset.

 

Sorry to say that our records are long gone, but most of our are memories are still with us...

 

Tell me a little more about 150. It may just jog my memory...

 

Dave

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Dave,

Actually I wanted to know purely for selfish reasons. I'm currently restoring an early 240z (HS30 00150) and I'm lead to believe that the original L24 block was probably replaced with an L28 block when the car had work done at DatZed sometime in the 80s, some people will think I'm crazy still trying to track down it's original block and it's more than likely it was sent to sims scrap metal, but you never know until you ask and I figured someone at DatZed may be able to give me some more history on the car. It's always nice to know more about such a car's past.

 

If you're interested in the project you can read pages of waffle here:

http://www.viczcar.com/forum/index.php/topic,13624.0.html

 

It sounds like you're a long way away from Australia these days. Enjoying retirement perhaps?

 

PS: I knew I'd heard the name Steve Newing before. Seems he did a lot of the work that was done on this Z.

http://www.autospeed.com/cms/article.html?&title=Yella-Delight&A=108383

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