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#81 sydney mike

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 11:09 PM

Mike, is that first one the one that you looked at a while back?

I agree it's a gorgeous colour and it shows off the curves exceptionally well. Much more so than white if I'm honest. I haven't made up my mind one way or another and the paint stage is so far ahead that I'm not wasting too much time on it for now. As it stands, it could be easier to just paint it a rusty colour to match most of the panels. :P


Yeah, that one was on ebay. Had a pre-bid inspection, the car was in Paddington back in 2007. Good honest car, would love to know where she is now.

cheers, Mike.

#82 chris240

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 08:02 PM

All the best George....just saw the postings  ::)
Mike, I too saw safari gold 000236 in 2007 when it was on ebay.
I drove up from Canberra to Padington and spent a few hours with the 1 owner elderly university  lecturer. The zed was badly rusted....he offered to me for $3k from memory as it had no bids on it. I declined.
After the auction ended I contacted the owner to congratulate him on the sale. Turned out it sold for $6k to an Asian gentleman from Brisbane who obviously couldnt inspect the car. For the 1st 5-6 pages of this blog, Id thought George may bought that particular car as I knew it had a low number, jeez that photo brings back memories.

#83 sydney mike

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 10:04 PM

All the best George....just saw the postings  ::)
Mike, I too saw safari gold 000236 in 2007 when it was on ebay.
I drove up from Canberra to Padington and spent a few hours with the 1 owner elderly university  lecturer. The zed was badly rusted....he offered to me for $3k from memory as it had no bids on it. I declined.
After the auction ended I contacted the owner to congratulate him on the sale. Turned out it sold for $6k to an Asian gentleman from Brisbane who obviously couldnt inspect the car. For the 1st 5-6 pages of this blog, Id thought George may bought that particular car as I knew it had a low number, jeez that photo brings back memories.


Hi Chris, you must have inspected the car after me because when I inspected it, IIRC I offered him around $4k and he politely declined and said that he will let the auction take its course. He must have started to get nervous close to auction ending.

She did have some rust in some odd spots but the fact that the car had been last resprayed 20 years ago at the time made me think that it was an honest car, you saw all the rust and no other surprises that had been hastily hidden by a recent respray. For some reason, not sure why that car seemed to have put a spell on me, I wanted her and I think I did bid upto $5k. Must be something like the pic below:

Posted Image

cheers, Mike.

P.S sorry George, hijack!

#84 chris240

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 07:39 AM

double thread hi-jack  :P
Mike, the firewall was gonski and so was everything under the rear bumper and under the sills....yes I was also mezmorised and excited on the drive upto Sydney, and then, deflated on the way back. Now Im a numbers person, and I'd give a right arm to have Georges 00019, I will even donate some of my spares to help it along. To me such a low number gets me excited !! :o

#85 George

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 08:44 PM

Snuck in a bit of car time tonight. Slow progress with many a bolt needing some caressing to come loose.

This was the result of the first three bolts for the night - all guard bolts. I'll have a lot of practise getting these out by the time I'm done with stripping the car.

Posted Image

Big piece of the puzzle arrived today thanks to Jason (dat2kman). An FS5C71-A (2.9) with shifter and tailshaft. The car came with a 71B box which I might keep as a spare or maybe just sell it.

Also pictured is my assistant. ;)

Posted Image



#86 George

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 04:19 PM

Found in the tool compartment of the parts car. Sadly the tape was not in the case.

Posted Image

#87 PB260Z

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 07:45 PM

Found in the tool compartment of the parts car. Sadly the tape was not in the case.


Showing my age, but I remember nearly all of those artists  :o

#88 Zedman240®

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 07:56 PM

Hmm..does it have the track listing? Should be the first album you play when the zeds finished  ;)

#89 George

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 08:09 PM

Track listing ;-)

http://www.oz-compil...w/albuminfo.htm

#90 gav240z

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 09:17 PM

Peter I still listen to that stuff lol...

I should start a thread similar to the what I watched last night.. But instead what I'm currently listening to ;).

#91 chris240

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 09:21 PM

I have Mike and the Mechanics albulm.....ie 12" vinyl for the young ones.

#92 PB260Z

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 09:30 PM

Peter I still listen to that stuff lol...

I should start a thread similar to the what I watched last night.. But instead what I'm currently listening to ;).

Could be good for a laugh, and would return George's thread to its original intent.


#93 George

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:44 PM

Stripping the 240Z

As a boy I took great pleasure in taking things apart and seeing how they work. If they functioned when I put them back together it was a bonus but that was never a measure of success and I never let that get in the way of my fun. To this day I enjoy the process and I’ve learned that taking things apart requires less finesse and is usually a lot easier than putting them back together. The opposite applies to a neglected and severely rusted car.

For the past couple of months I have been chipping away at stripping the 240Z. It currently sits in the garage bare of all the bits that make it a functioning marvel. It has been a time consuming process (partly because the car is at my parent’s place) with frustrations along the way but all of it enjoyable. A snapped bolt here and a stubborn clip there, strange wires and plywood panels aplenty – and of course the odd coin found for my purse.

Observations

The first thing that you notice after stripping a car is that the parts you take off take up far more room than they have a right to. After all, they weren’t taking up much room while on the car but all of a sudden you need boxes and shelves, hanging room and wall space for leaning panels on and snap lock bags for nuts, bolts and clips aplenty. It’s about here that you start to appreciate the work that went into manufacturing and assembling what is an elegant mechanical machine.

I sought out advice prior to starting the stripping process and received a lot of good tips (thanks to you guys). Repeatedly I was told to bag and tag everything, even the broken parts. This advice was echoed in Wick Humble’s book, 'How to Restore Your Datsun Z-Car'. I have taken this advice on board but haven’t been obsessed about it. Some of the parts were not original so it was pointless to waste my time with labeling and storing them, others seemed so obvious as to not require any documentation while others yet, for example the wiring, seemed so complex that it was pointless for me to fuss over it since I have no plans to do the job myself. I might be regretting that last one as I am now considering having a go…

Other advice mentioned patience and a delicate touch. The car is over 40 years old and requires a gentle and patient hand. I can tell you I’ve used hammers and mallets, grinders both large and small, screwdrivers that will scare the screws off by simply pointing at them, vice grips that have survived what looks like a throwing competition, but most of all a large broom to sweep away the rust that falls off every time I breathe near the car. I will concede it takes a delicate touch at times but when that bastard of a bolt doesn’t want to budge after being soaked in enough penetrating liquids to develop a mild addiction to it, you just have to bring out the breaker bar and standby with a grinder as a threat.


Mistakes

You won’t learn anything unless you have a go and make some mistakes. I had a go and now I know that taking out a windshield with previously mentioned scary screwdriver is not a good idea. The right tool for the job rings a bell but when you don’t have that right tool it’s mighty tempting to make do with what’s at hand.  Exercising patience avoids costly mistakes.

Throwing out damaged original parts is a big mistake with emphasis on the word original. Even if you would never use that part again it makes sense to keep it for reference until the day you have a replacement in hand. There are so many variations in parts from early cars to late cars, between models and between cars of different markets that finding the exact part you need becomes a huge task without an original for reference. This of course applies only if you are concerned with originality which I am. I learned this lesson very quickly and now I have a cache of broken clips, panels, bits of trim and even some brown stuff that looks like horse hair…

Mechanical

Mechanical objects fascinate me. My intention is not to sound macho but I love the challenge of stripping something bare, getting my hands dirty with its grease and grime, figuring out how it all works in a detective like manner and damned be your instruction manual as I soak up the marvel, the simplicity of mechanical objects designed and built by my father’s functional and practical generation.

The 240Z is one of these mechanical objects and while certain parts of it are complex and possibly beyond my mediocre skills, the majority of it is simple and just makes perfect mechanical sense as I’m tearing it down which gives me confidence for the restoration and then the assembly phase of the project.

#94 fly-s30

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 07:32 PM

Here here! Excellent soliloquy there, it all rings true. Esp the word : Patience 
Good to see you having a go at this early bird

#95 CroS13

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 07:43 PM

Great write up! Yes i can attest to the amount of room a car takes up when its not bolted together, i have panels in the roof rafters, under the house, i think I've spent close to $500 over the last year at bunnings buying plastic storage bins to put everything in.

I've also found that for me its 30% time actually using tools to remove stuff, 30% of my time taking photos and the remainder is spent uploading photo's and categorizing them, and writing notes in MS paint on them!

If a screwdriver was the wrong tool for removing a windshield, what is the right tool? I sat in the passenger seat awkwardly "Leg pressed" the front windshield out with a friend to catch it once it popped out the seal!

Rudolf.

#96 PB260Z

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 09:10 PM

Great write up George.
Sounds like you are embracing the challenge that lies ahead.

Photos ?



#97 Brabham

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 09:21 PM

Pressing the window out with your legs is the correct way, but try to loosen the rubber windshield seal and press it under the lip with your fingers first. Do it gradually and work your way around the screen and you can save both screen and rubber. The first screen I did I cut the rubber to get it out, saved the screen but look back and realise that is not the right way and could have saved the rubber too. Second one I did with hands alone, just working my way around it rolling the rubber under the lip. depends if sealant has been used around the screen too.

There is an old saying in engineering - experience is proportional to amount of equipment destroyed. just as long as you learn and don't make the same mistake twice. It also helps to know what you can do yourself and what needs to be outsourced.

Good work George, keep it up

#98 George

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 10:01 AM

Tonight I'm contemplating sleeping inside my empty car shell as it will be the last time I see it for many months.

Tomorrow it will be picked up and delivered to Paul in Adelaide who will restore it to its former glory.

No tears will be shed when the car is towed away; maybe tears of joy - I've swept away more rust than any man ought to.


Here is the shell as it stands.





#99 gav240z

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 10:13 AM

You know when I saw the opening part of the video, I thought it didn't look as bad as I thought when I saw it all stripped down. Then when the battery tray area came into focus I thought "Ohhhhh" and then it said "I love my car" and I wanted to laugh and then as you slowly panned around the A pillar, the floor, battery box etc.. I thought "Yeah that is proper rust". Then of course as you went around the rest of the car I thought "Yes" rusty ;).

Can't wait to see what Paul does with it.

#100 benny

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 10:21 AM

wow!! atleast its straight  :o




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