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OXY WELDING


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#1 Ledge

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 07:23 PM

Hi Chaps,
Well i have been rather busy latterly but today i had to do some Oxy welding on a panel so thought
i would take the opportunity to do a demo.

When Oxy welding in replacement sections the better you can get the join the easier it will be, spend a bit
more time getting a perfect fit and it will save you time. Not crucial however.

I normally use a .6 tip in the Oxy but i couldn't find it so had to use a .8.
Use a couple of magnets or clamps to hold you panel in place while you start.

I find it best to start up one end and work towards the other, in this case i started on the top of the guard
as this is the most important part to get spot on. This is something you will pick up the more you do it.


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Start with one tack. You must let it cool to the point where you can touch it.
If it moves make sure you hammer and dolly it back to alignment before you do the next tack.

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One at a time following the same process do another tack on the heat ring of the previous weld.

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This takes time, Don't rush it and LET IT COOL between tacks and also get the panels aligned after every tack.

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Panels will either go UP, Down, Tight or Loose. But you should only hit the WELD.
A couple of gentle taps with the hammer and dolly on the weld will pull the alignment back.

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Continue until the whole section is tacked in place.

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Once you have Oxy tack welded the panel in place it is crucial to get it all back in the right spot.
If you want to neaten up some messy tacks then go for it, just make sure the panel is lined up.

As this is a guard it has basically 3 separate runs with the Oxy.
Start at one end and this is where you can save some time if your join has no gap, Fusion the two panels together
if you need to use filler rod that's fine too.I just do one pass. no need to stop and move around to keep the panel cool.

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After each run let the panel cool

Once you have welded the whole panel. LET IT COOL. Don't worry that it has gone a bit out of shape. Trust me.

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Now that the panel has cooled you can straighten it up. you will only need to hit the WELD LINE.
Do not hit anywhere else, Work your way along the weld line with your hammer and dolly and it will
go back into shape. IT WILL.

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When you have it close gently grind off any lumpy welds on both the front and back if any.
Then continue to plannish it off until its perfect.

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Now if you have got the Oxy setup right and welded thoroughly
the weld should look the same on both sides, If you see a line or gaps
on the back you haven't let the pool go deep enough.

The joy of Oxy welding is that you can still work it.
If you need to do a heat shrink on the weld you can.
You can move it around without cracking.
This process takes 3 times longer than MIG but
its the only way to metal finish perfectly.

I will Oxy weld 90% of all panels i do. Make sure you can get behind it.
Or make your replacement sections in a way where you can get behind them.

Hope this helps you guys

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Cheers
Paul
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#2 zzzzed

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 07:41 PM

Top work Paul. I wish I had the time where I work to do this  to do this, but unfortunetly insurance and car yard work takes priority. Keep the tutorials coming mate

#3 1600dave

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 07:46 PM

Nice !

It may be mostly due to my skill levels or lack thereof, but for people like myself (rank amateurs  ::)), I have achieved much better results since I upgraded from an old CIC Colt torch to a Henrob (aka Dillon / DHC 2000 ). More concentrated flame resulting in less distortion. I'd love to hear your thoughts on what makes a good oxy setup (especially as I'm currently looking to upgrade my 30 year old regulators....)

And don't overlook the versatility of oxy - as well as all my panel work, mine has welded up a rotisserie for the car (4mm RHS) and has recently done all the welding on a cut'n'shut gearbox bellhousing (welding an L-series front half onto an S15 6 speed rear half).

I love my oxy  ;)
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#4 PeterAllen

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 07:59 PM

Paul - You might like to demonstrate how the weld must penetrate. I see so many chaps at TAFE produce surface welds!

(edit) Sorry, you did cover that point.

#5 Ledge

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 08:17 PM

Mick you are welcome to come up to the workshop on a day off or when your "sick"
and i will show you some shet.

1600DAVE I must admit i have never used the DHC torch. I suppose its what you get used to, If
that works for you mate then stick with it.
The set i have is a new Cigweld kit, Took me a bit to get the pressures right, They all seem to be slightly different.
For doing the panel you want low pressure and a soft flame. As i said i like the .6 tip size for panels.

Peter good point i have told people what to look for in the first post, cheers.

Paul
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#6 zzzzed

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 08:33 PM

I will take you up in that one day

#7 Ledge

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 07:38 PM

OK Lads,
Here is another example,
Oxy welding up the gas filler hole in the rear 1/4 of the KGC110.
Yep rear 1/4 and Oxy.
No guts no glory.  (it fine Shane get off the floor) ha ha.

Still needs a bit of dressing up after sand blasting but all the unwanted
holes are now filled
Cheers
Paul

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#8 Kenmeri

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 04:56 AM

Nice work Paul,  It's great to see some progress already! 

#9 gav240z

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 08:49 PM

Updated images so they are no longer broken. Set topic as sticky also.

#10 Riceburner

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Posted 24 May 2015 - 09:58 PM

I do oxy welding on copper pipe and brass fittings at work. Do you know if the process is similar to that and what sort of filler rods do you use?

#11 gav240z

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Posted 24 May 2015 - 10:55 PM

I do oxy welding on copper pipe and brass fittings at work. Do you know if the process is similar to that and what sort of filler rods do you use?


The rods are mild steel, it's been a long time since I did brazing at school in the 90s lol.. But I recall it being similar. I'd say you would pick it up very fast.

#12 1600dave

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 10:52 AM

Brazing / silver soldering is different to oxy welding in that you don't melt the objects being joined but just flow a special, lower melting point filler rod into the joint and around the bits you're joining together.

Oxy welding actually melts a small area of the objects being joined, plus the filler rod, which all runs together and forms the "weld" when it cools down (back to solid).

Best filler rod to use is something that is as close as possible to the metal being joined. For mild steel (ie panels) just grab 1.6mm mild steel welding rods from somewhere like BOC.  For fancy work (one example might be making a sheet metal aluminium bike tank that will end up being polished), your best bet is to cut a thin strip off the metal you're using to fabricate the tank and use that as the filler rod. Having said that, I've never had the need to do this and normally just use TIG aluminium welding rods when oxy welding aluminium.

#13 72240Z

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Posted 01 January 2018 - 12:44 PM

I would like to try gas welding body panels but have one question Ledge says to use a .6 tip but when I looked up a welding tip chart the sizes are different for different brands.

I know this is an old post but does anyone know what size that would be on this chart.

novac_tip_chart.jpg

 



#14 1600dave

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Posted 01 January 2018 - 12:57 PM

I don't use the same brand torch, but if I had to guess I'd say its 0.6mm.



#15 72240Z

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Posted 01 January 2018 - 02:07 PM

Thank you Dave for the quick reply.



#16 1600dave

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Posted 01 January 2018 - 02:29 PM

As a comparison, I use a Henrob #0.5 tip for pretty much all panel work, which is listed as .635mm metric equivalent in your chart. 



#17 gav240z

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 03:37 PM

I also have the Henrob / DHC 2000 torch but find it a bit heavy. Apparently good for saving gas and minimising heat distortion though!



#18 Enzo

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 03:59 PM

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"I also have the Henrob / DHC 2000 torch but find it a bit heavy."

Try one of these Gav.
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#19 1600dave

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 05:55 PM

I don't find it heavy as such, but I'm also not a huge fan of the "pistolgrip" arrangement and usually end up hanging onto the ends of the hoses where they attach to the torch after welding for longer periods. I just find it a little awkward and your hand is too close to the weld pool.

 

I was over using it by the time I welded up all the tube in this !

 

cage5_zps3uvrgamh.JPG


Edited by 1600dave, 03 January 2018 - 05:57 PM.

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#20 gilltech

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 06:36 PM

Ditto what 1600dave says, I don't like the pistolgrip and much prefer the conventional type of gas torch, the latter has perfectly fine general balance whatever flame size is selected and not at all tiring to use.






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